Yellowstone Park after Labor Day

After the Labor Day holiday, the incessant tourist crowds in Yellowstone National Park will dwindle, and solitude can again be found on the roads, rivers, and hiking trails. Yellowstone National Park is a wonderful place to be in the fall. The leaves of the trees begin to turn yellow and add a new layer of depth to the endless greens of spring and summer. The roads are more open and comfortable to navigate, and if you enjoy spotting animals from the roads while you drive through the park, the cooler weather allows most of the animals to be more active for longer periods of the day.

Yellowstone Park after Labor Day, UDAP Bear Spray-Yellowstone National Park

The elk of Yellowstone get active in the early fall and when the rut is peaked, you can spend a full day watching a big bull elk chase and herd cows in grass meadows. Bugling bulls are commonplace in the rut, and if you spend any time camping in the park, and elk are nearby, it may be difficult to sleep with the nighttime and early morning bugles. Although, listening to bull elk bugle back and forth is an inspiring experience.

The rivers of Yellowstone feel more open and the cooler weather will trigger Blue Wing Olive and Midge hatches throughout the fall fishing season. The cutthroat trout that inhabit rivers like the Lamar, Yellowstone, and Gardiner Rivers on the northeast end of the park, and the Madison, Gibbon and Firehole Rivers of the west, will come up to the surface to feed on the insects in the late mornings and afternoons. A handy tip for fishing Yellowstone National Park, and it applies at any time of the year is: if you hike out of sight of the road, and you start fishing at that point, continuing to work your way from the road, most of the fish will be fresh and rested, because most everyone who visits the park for vacation rarely adventures more than one hundred yards from the nearest road.

Regardless of what your reasons are for being in the park this fall – the dramatic colors, the active animals, or the solitude – Yellowstone is an incredible place to spend any amount of time. And remember, Yellowstone is a wild place, and you should always be prepared for anything.

As always, when visiting one of our fantastic National Parks or enjoying the great outdoors, please be sure to bring along your UDAP Bear Spray. 

Bear Spray Recycling Information

We’d like to encourage everyone to RECYCLE their bear spray canisters! There is a bear spray recycling machine located in the greater Yellowstone area. Bear Spray recycling is a fantastic concept and in May of 2011 the first ever fully functioning machine was built. If you recreate in and around Yellowstone, you can drop off your bear spray at many Forest Service and Fish and Wildlife Parks locations. If you are traveling, you may drop off your bear spray to be recycled at any of the park entrances, many hotels, and some airports prior to leaving. Also, if you wish to send us your canister directly we will recycle it for you.

Bear Spray Recycling

To send a canister to UDAP, please use this address.

UDAP Industries, Inc.

Recycling Dept.

1703 Waterline Road

Butte , MT 59701

Expired cans can also be used for training you and your family. Be sure to practice with it away from people, buildings and pets. Make sure it is in an area where the spray will not return to you and your family causing the uncomfortable effects of the product.

You can also give your spray to a friend or relative if it has not been used. We would never recommend using a canister from someone that has sprayed it before. You can even give it to a ranger in the park. Many rangers will take the product as they or their coworkers use it frequently for practice.

The recycling process is significantly efficient. It has the capability to actually separate the active ingredient from the inert contents through a coalescing filter process. Then the separated ingredients can be reused. Early on in development UDAP mentioned that the propellant could possibly be used to recharge air conditioners in vehicles. It is our understanding that this is what’s being done. Also we introduced the idea of the pepper being used in paints for the bottom of boats. Pepper deters barnacles from attaching to surfaces that have been pepper treated. Also pepper is used in creams in pharmaceuticals for arthritis pain relief.  The aluminum canister is sold to a recycling business.

Hiking in The Great Outdoors

Are you a hiker or do you just like to take long strolls in God’s Country? Well if you answered yes to that question, please don’t forget your bear spray. Hottest Bear spray works on more than just bear! Read below to her what one of our customers had to say about her encounter with a moose!

“UDAP works on moose! 
On a trail run with our dogs in Red Lodge, MT this morning we came across a moose and new calf. Our dogs are trained to not bark at or harass wildlife- and we even went off trail to give her a wide berth, but even that wasn’t enough to keep her from charging. She took 2 blasts from our canisters- and it was like she hit a glass wall. She charged 3 more times from different angles and each time took spray to the face. She moved on, and so did we.”

Thank you for such a great product! We don’t go into the backcountry without it. – Charlene Giffin- Roberts, MT

Hiking in the Great Outdoors

We encourage you to get outdoors and enjoy nature the way it was intended to be appreciated! Bring your camera, take lots of pictures and don’t forget your bear spray for all of those wild animals that you may encounter along the way!

Camping in Yellowstone Park

Are you an avid camper? Or want something fun and different to do with your family this summer? Camping in Yellowstone Park is an awesome way to enjoy the park with your family. Some of the highlights and attractions include amazing backcountry, bicycle-friendly campsite, RV parks and hiking to name a few. There are numerous camping options in Yellowstone Park. For a complete list of campsites please click here for more information.

 

Camping in Yellowstone Park

And as always, remember when you’re outdoors in bear country this summer to carry your Bear spray with you at all times!

Article in the Montana Standard

January 23, 2011 12:00 am  • 
Montana

Shortly after Tim Lynch told his Bozeman boss about his interest in moving home to Butte, the company and Lynch’s family soon had a new mailing address.

Since late in 2008, Universal Defense Alternative Products Inc. has operated from a new facility just off Harrison Avenue.

Lynch, a Butte native, serves as general manager of the bear spray company’s 4,000-square-foot Butte operation.

“We are doing very well and we are growing at a very fast pace,” Lynch said. “We had a great year.”

The company formed in 1994, two years after a grizzly bear attacked owner Mark Matheny while bow hunting in Gallatin County.

To read the full article click here.