Hiking and Backpacking With a Dog Safety Tips

Bear Shock electric phone, Hiking and Backpacking With a Dog Safety Tips

Hiking and backpack camping with dogs is enjoyable. Dogs are excellent companions in the backcountry, although dogs can also pose several problems for backpackers and hikers. One major issue when you are in the backcountry with a dog is that it can create an encounter with a bear.   For instance, If a dog is sleeping in a tent with their human companions, they may be carrying several interesting smells on their coat that bears may find interesting. However it is a very rare occurrence for a bear to invade a tent, and, when they do, it is usually because of left out food scraps or an unkept camp.Be sure to use the UDAP Bear Shock fence at your campground site for protection from bears.

Bear Shock electric phone, Hiking and Backpacking With a Dog Safety Tips

If you do run into a bear out on the trail, a dog may be tempted to run after the bear, barking, and the bear may feel that it has to defend itself. Dog’s can be great instigators of trouble, although when the bear charges the dog, or attacks the dog, the dog is going to run back to you, and he will be bringing the scared, angry bear with him. An encounter like this is completely preventable, by placing a leash on the dog when you are out on the trail.

If you are going to be traveling in bear country with your dogs, leash them, but also give them a job to perform. Dogs can carry their own food and, possibly, other supplies on their backs. Keep the load light, though, dogs should not be required to haul too much weight on the trail. There are even backpacks built exclusively for dogs. If the dog is required to carry important supplies, then they should be leashed. A hot, tired dog isn’t going to consider the load on his back when he sees a wide, muddy puddle or a deep, pristine mountain lake. A dog carrying sleeping bags should be leashed, at least until the backpack is removed.

Dogs do make excellent companions on the trail. Unlike some of your friends at the bottom of your call list, the dog will not complain out on trail. Dogs can also sense possible dangers long before their human counterparts, and dogs may sense that cow moose around the bend, or the rattlesnake coiled at the other side of the log. Although, proper precautions should be taken, when hiking and backpacking with dogs in bear country.

Smartphone Theft Epidemic

The theft of handheld devices is the fastest-growing street crime in the Country, where more and more incidents are turning violent.  Walking down the street and talking on your iPhone, where a thief will attempt to rip it right out of your hand. If you try to stop the thief, the thief will beat you up until he gets the phone. Victims have ended up with broken bones, in the hospital and left with no recourse to get their stolen smartphones back.

Smartphone Theft Epidemic

San Francisco District Attorney George Gascon, about 1.6 million Americans had their smartphones stolen last year. And according to the Federal Communications Commission, around 40 percent of robberies in major cities now involve mobile devices.

Mobile phones have reshaped that way that we live. Smartphones can be sold on the black market for anywhere from $300 to $600. Law enforcement and Government Officials are asking manufacturers for a kill switch to be put in mobile devices that will render the phone unusable by the thief or anyone if it is reported stolen. There is much debate from the manufactures in doing this. Will it become mandated? We don’t know, but we would like to recommend that you carry your UDAP Pepper Spray with you when you are out walking. Be aware of your surroundings and the people around you. Put your mobile devices away and out of sight when you are walking in major cities. Be safe!

Smartphone Theft Epidemic

 

Bear Spray Recycling Information

We’d like to encourage everyone to RECYCLE their bear spray canisters! There is a bear spray recycling machine located in the greater Yellowstone area. Bear Spray recycling is a fantastic concept and in May of 2011 the first ever fully functioning machine was built. If you recreate in and around Yellowstone, you can drop off your bear spray at many Forest Service and Fish and Wildlife Parks locations. If you are traveling, you may drop off your bear spray to be recycled at any of the park entrances, many hotels, and some airports prior to leaving. Also, if you wish to send us your canister directly we will recycle it for you.

Bear Spray Recycling

To send a canister to UDAP, please use this address.

UDAP Industries, Inc.

Recycling Dept.

1703 Waterline Road

Butte , MT 59701

Expired cans can also be used for training you and your family. Be sure to practice with it away from people, buildings and pets. Make sure it is in an area where the spray will not return to you and your family causing the uncomfortable effects of the product.

You can also give your spray to a friend or relative if it has not been used. We would never recommend using a canister from someone that has sprayed it before. You can even give it to a ranger in the park. Many rangers will take the product as they or their coworkers use it frequently for practice.

The recycling process is significantly efficient. It has the capability to actually separate the active ingredient from the inert contents through a coalescing filter process. Then the separated ingredients can be reused. Early on in development UDAP mentioned that the propellant could possibly be used to recharge air conditioners in vehicles. It is our understanding that this is what’s being done. Also we introduced the idea of the pepper being used in paints for the bottom of boats. Pepper deters barnacles from attaching to surfaces that have been pepper treated. Also pepper is used in creams in pharmaceuticals for arthritis pain relief.  The aluminum canister is sold to a recycling business.

Should you wasp spray instead of bear spray?

I recently heard a self-defense teacher tell her students that they should keep a can of wasp spray by their bed if they couldn’t afford bear spray and they could also carry a can of wasp spray with them to help with self-defense.

Wasp Spray vs Bear Spray

But we’d like to discourage you from doing this for 2 very important reasons.

The active ingredient in most sprays are derived from plants and intended to penetrate the nervous systems of insects and kill them. Wasp sprays have not been formulated to work as self-defense on humans has not been tested and it could make a human sick, but may not stop a person who is trying to attack you. The main ingredient in wasp spray is pyrethrin and its toxic, it may make your assailant sick, but it won’t stop them from attacking you.

And using wasp spray on a bear is going to have the same reaction. It might make the bear more angry, but it isn’t going to stop him.

The other reason is that if you read on the can of wasp spray, you will see that it is illegal in most states to use wasp spray for self-defense. It is also a federal crime as well, “It is a violation of federal law to use this product in a manner inconsistent with its labeling.”

The biggest train of thought was that wasp spray could spray and go shoot farther than bear spray, but that isn’t true either. Read the package insert on your bear spray or visit our website and you will see that UDAP Bear Spray is very effective and can spray up to 35 feet. So no more wasp spray!

Wasp Spray vs Bear Spray