IGBC CLARIFIES BEAR SPRAY RECOMMENDATIONS

IGBC CLARIFIES BEAR SPRAY RECOMMENDATIONS

A victory for the safety of people in bear country recently occurred when the Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee (IGBC) took unanimous action to clarify its bear spray recommendations.  Comprised of representatives of various state, federal, and Canadian wildlife management agencies, the IGBC helps coordinate the recovery of grizzly bear populations, and provides public information about bear safety and the use of bear spray.  The IGBC has historically recommended that bear sprays have a minimum duration of six seconds.  Recently, however, the IGBC adopted a new policy that recommends the use of any EPA-registered bear spray product without reference to spray duration, that is, the time it takes for a can to discharge completely.  The IGBC correctly recognized that existing federal bear spray registration standards are adequate for public safety and that consumers should follow the manufacturer’s instructions for proper use of their selected bear spray product.  Exercising its collective professional judgment, the IGBC appropriately withdrew its outdated six-second spray duration recommendation, which lacked any scientific or empirical justification, and conflicted with modern bear spray studies.

Following the IGBC’s decision, UDAP has received various inquiries about the meaning of and reasons for the IGBC’s action.  Many of these questions appear to have arisen from a misunderstanding of how bear spray is regulated, how it is intended to be used, and from incorrect or incomplete reports in the media.  The following Question and Answer narrative is intended to provide clarity for those who have reasonably been left confused by recent media coverage.  Customer safety is UDAP’s number one priority, and we feel an obligation to provide clear, accurate, and complete information to our customers.  If you have questions or need further information, please do not hesitate to contact UDAP’s leadership here, or visit UDAP’s  website.  We would be delighted to hear from you.

 

Who regulates bear spray?

 Bear spray is considered a pesticide and is regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) pursuant to broad authority granted under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA).  FIFRA establishes that all pesticides sold or distributed in the United States must be registered by the EPA.  Registration is based on evaluation of scientific data, product performance testing, and assessment of the risks and benefits of a product’s use.  Currently, there are only four EPA-registered bear spray products on the market.  The EPA also regulates pesticide labels and instructions, which allows the agency to control how products are used.  It is unlawful for any person to use a registered pesticide product, such as bear spray, in a manner inconsistent with its labeling.


What role does the IGBC have regarding bear spray?

Unlike the EPA, the IGBC does not have statutory authority to regulate bear spray, or its registration, labeling, or use.  Instead, the IGBC’s mission is to “Recover, manage, and secure the future of grizzly bear populations and their habitat so that grizzly bears no longer require protections afforded by the [Endangered Species Act].”  The use of bear spray is an important management tool that serves the IGBC’s mission by helping promote the recovery and survival of the grizzly bear as a species.  Bear spray is a powerful, non-lethal deterrent that, when used correctly, can stop a bear attack or lessen its severity without permanently harming the animal.  It is an effective alternative to lethal personal protection options, such as firearms, and its use can both reduce human injuries caused by bears and decrease the number of bears killed in self-defense.  For these reasons, the IGBC recommends bear spray when used in conjunction with proper bear avoidance safety techniques, and has historically provided the public with guidelines for selecting an adequate bear spray product.

 

What was the IGBC’s recent action?

The IGBC recently revised and clarified how it will provide the public with information and recommendations about selecting bear spray.  During the infancy of commercial bear spray development in the 1990s, the IGBC established a set of bear spray guidelines that included such things as recommended spray distance and pattern, concentration of active ingredient, minimum net weight, and minimum spray duration.  For years, the IGBC recommended the use of bear spray with a minimum spray duration of six seconds.

On December 13, 2016, the IGBC Executive Committee unanimously withdrew the six-second duration guideline in favor of recommending the use of any EPA-registered bear spray product, without regard to a numeric bear spray duration criterion.  The IGBC recognized that EPA’s current bear spray registration standards are adequate, and it committed to rewriting its bear spray guidelines so that public has the most accurate and reliable information available.  The IGBC will publish its revised bear spray recommendations by the end of February 2017.

Please note that the IGBC’s action does not, in any way, allow for the production of small, palm-sized pepper sprays to be marketed as “bear spray.”  EPA’s pesticide registration requirements prevent this from occurring.

 

What led to the IGBC’s clarification of its bear spray recommendations?

The exercise of sound professional judgment and scientific reasoning is what most directly led to the IGBC’s revision of its bear spray recommendations.  UDAP played a supporting role by providing information and initiating discussion and review of the six-second spray duration guideline.  In June 2016, the IGBC invited UDAP to make a presentation to the Executive Committee at its summer meeting in Bonners Ferry, Idaho.  At the public meeting, UDAP highlighted the lack of scientific or empirical support for the six-second spray duration guideline and explained how the recommendation served no purpose other than to improperly promote or endorse one particular commercial bear spray manufacturer over all others.  After its presentation, UDAP requested the following two actions:

  1. That the IGBC withdraw the six-second spray duration recommendation and reconsider the committee’s role in issuing public position statements on bear spray product performance and efficacy; and
  1. That the IGBC fulfill its promise not to promote or endorse one commercial bear spray product over any other.

The IGBC agreed to consider UDAP’s requests and formed a bear spray work group to evaluate its bear spray recommendations and appearance of implied product endorsement.  At the IGBC’s winter meeting on December 13, the work group reported its findings to the Executive Committee and recommended taking action consistent with UDAP’s request.  Upon the work group’s recommendation, the IGBC unanimously agreed to continue to recommend use of EPA-registered bear spray products and to rewrite its bear spray recommendations/guidelines without reference to a numerical spray duration criterion.  The IGBC also agreed to continue to be vigilant and conscious not to promote or endorse any one commercial bear spray product over another, and decided to add an additional disclaimer to its website.

The IGBC’s actions are good for public safety and government transparency.  In revising its bear spray recommendations, the IGBC has embraced science and sound professional judgment, and demonstrated a commitment to providing the public with accurate, reliable, and meaningful information about bear spray.


Did UDAP file “legal action” against the IGBC?

No, contrary to erroneous media reports, UDAP has not filed legal action against the IGBC in any court or administrative body.  UDAP presented its concerns in an open public forum at the IGBC’s regularly scheduled summer meeting.  UDAP submitted written materials and a PowerPoint presentation for the IGBC’s review and consideration, and engaged the IGBC in a professional, courteous, and productive manner, without any need for litigation.

 

What were UDAP’s main concerns in bringing this issue to the IGBC?

UDAP’s main concerns were: (1) public safety, (2) the need for accurate public information about bear spray, and (3) the basic notion that bear spray recommendations ought to be grounded in sound science, not speculative opinion.

UDAP’s core mission is to provide for the safety of people who are hunting, fishing, and recreating in bear country, and its products are specifically designed to fulfill that purpose.  As a company that stakes its reputation on keeping people safe and alive in bear country, UDAP was concerned that the IGBC’s six-second bear spray guideline was not based on science or empirical data, and yet it was being represented to the public as a benchmark for product safety and performance. In truth, there is no scientific literature or peer-reviewed research concluding that bear spray with a six-second spray time is any safer or more effective than bear spray with a four- or five-second spray time, when used properly.  Indeed, the leading contemporary bear spray researcher, Dr. Tom S. Smith, has concluded that “based on data we collected, there is no indication that any of the commercially available products bests another by durations that vary by a few seconds,” but instead “all fall within an acceptable range of effectiveness in light of the results of the study I conducted on the efficacy of bear spray in Alaska.”

Consistent with Dr. Smith’s observations, EPA-registered bear spray products have proven to be effective, non-lethal tools for deterring bear attacks, and there is no evidence that any EPA-registered bear spray product is unsafe or inadequate for its intended purpose, even though a majority of bear sprays do not meet the old six-second guideline.  There is an obvious disconnect between the six-second guideline and the actual performance and efficacy of bear spray in the field, and as long as the six-second guideline remained in circulation, the public was not receiving the most accurate and reliable information in selecting bear spray.  UDAP – with the support of another bear spray producer, scientists, experts in human-bear interactions, and users of bear spray – contacted the IGBC to voice its concerns and set the record straight on the six-second rule.

Upon review of UDAP’s presentation, written submissions, and its own independent research, the IGBC unanimously decided to remove the duration guideline from its public recommendations.  It is anticipated that the IGBC will publish its revised bear spray recommendations and white paper by the end of February 2017.

UDAP supports the IGBC’s decision, and applauds the Executive Committee’s efforts to provide the public with accurate information concerning bear spray and its use.  The IGBC members showed leadership and interest in public safety by basing its decision on available science and proven experience, rather than the speculative opinions of those advocating for an arbitrary six-second rule.  Those living, working, and recreating in bear country are safer today and will gain more confidence in the use of bear spray due to the actions of the IGBC and its clarified recommendations.  Removal of the six-second rule will also eliminate favoritism, alleviate concerns about implied government endorsement of commercial products, and contribute to better public education concerning bear spray.  Those looking to purchase bear spray should seek out an EPA-registered bear spray product and follow the manufacturer’s instructions printed on the label for its proper use.

If you wish to learn more about the underlying fallacies of the six-second guideline, please see UDAP’s written submissions to the IGBC, here and here, and its PowerPoint presentation, here.

 

Where did the erroneous “six-second” recommendation come from?  

The origin of the six-second spray duration recommendation is shrouded in uncertainty.  What is known is that in the late 1990s, when commercial bear spray use and development was in its relative infancy, the IGBC tasked the Yellowstone Ecosystem Subcommittee (YES) to issue a bear spray position statement to inform and educate the public about the use of bear spray for self-defense in the backcountry.  The YES committee recommended bear spray with a range of 25 feet and use of the “largest size” can available, to accommodate things like environmental conditions (wind, rain, cold), highly agitated bears, multiple bear encounters, multiple charge encounters, and having reserve spray for the hike out.

The IGBC subsequently outsourced its review of bear spray to the Center for Wildlife Information (CWI), a now defunct non-profit organization which was led by an individual without any formal scientific training and who is believed to have had a close association with the only bear spray company (at the time) to produce a can that sprayed for longer than six seconds.  In 1999, CWI presented its bear spray recommendations and urged the IGBC to adopt a six-second spray duration guideline, which it did.  It was at this time that the YES committee’s original recommendation to use the “largest size” can available was transformed into a numeric duration recommendation.

While the six-second duration recommendation has persisted for years, the underlying basis and justification for the guideline has never been substantiated with scientific or empirical data, despite repeated inquiries and a formal request under the Freedom of Information Act, 5 U.S.C. § 552, for documents, studies, reports, and any other supporting information.  The lack of any supporting documentation calls into question the transparency and neutrality of the process, reasoning, and justification for the six-second rule.

Promoters of the duration guideline continue to refer to the research of Dr. Charles Jonkel and Carrie Hunt from the 1970s and 1980s to support their position.  While the importance of Dr. Jonkel’s and Ms. Hunt’s research to the development of bear spray as an effective deterrent cannot be overstated, their work simply does not conclude or provide direct support for any numeric duration guideline, let alone a six-second requirement.  At most, Ms. Hunt’s research suggests the need for bear spray that has “repeated application,” which all EPA-registered bear sprays are capable of doing.  Moreover, Dr. Jonkel’s and Ms. Hunt’s research predates the EPA’s regulation and oversight of bear spray, and so they lacked any opportunity to test the performance and efficacy of the products now on the market, which significantly limits the relevance of their research to the question of duration.

Another misperception commonly held by proponents of the six-second rule is that six seconds is needed to compensate for various contingencies, such as repeated attacks, multiple bear scenarios, weather, and the hike out.  These scenarios do not, however, lend themselves to a quantifiable duration standard and they fail to establish why six seconds is the “magic” number to accommodate all these situations, as opposed to some other number.  What these scenarios do suggest is the need for a bear spray capable of deploying repeated bear-stopping bursts.  As the IGBC’s own bear spray testing shows, even a 7.9 oz can with a four-second discharge time is more than capable of accommodating these various scenarios, assuming it is deployed properly (i.e., using one-second bursts, as per manufacturer instructions).  Moreover, these scenarios can be accommodated in other ways, such as recommending use of the largest volume canister of spray, as the YES committee suggested, or by carrying multiple cans of bear spray.

 

If not duration, what is important when choosing a bear spray product?

 

Mark Matheny Grizzly Attack SurvivorAs a grizzly bear attack survivor, Mark Matheny – the founder and president of UDAP – encourages the use of a high-volume spray. Published studies demonstrate that in many bear encounters an individual has less than two seconds to react before the bear makes contact. In these situations, it is not a matter of how long the can sprays in a constant duration, it is a matter of how quickly the product can deliver a bear-stopping dose of spray.  Bear spray is specifically designed to be deployed in repeated bursts, and UDAP bear spray, in particular, is designed to deliver a powerful, high-volume spray with each burst, when it’s needed most.  Given bear spray canisters with equal potency and spray characteristics, other than duration, would you rather have the spray that comes out slower (longer duration/lower volume) or the one that comes out faster (shorter duration/higher volume) if a grizzly bear is charging at you?

In addition to having a high volume, bear spray should be registered by the EPA and be clearly labeled for use on bears.  It should spray in an expanding fog pattern with sufficient distance to intercept a charging bear, and it should contain the highest concentration of capsaicin and related capsaicinoids regulated by EPA (currently, 2.0%).  The net weight of bear spray should be at least 225 grams or 7.9 ounces, as required by the EPA, and it should be capable of providing repeated bursts of spray.

While the above considerations are important for selecting a bear spray product, it is even more critical for the user to be familiar with the specific performance characteristics of their chosen product and to understand and follow the manufacturer’s instructions for its use . . . and to practice.

 

I have seen numerous instructions for the proper use of bear spray, but they are not always consistent.  Which one should I follow?

You should follow the manufacturer’s instructions printed on the label of your chosen bear spray product.  Bear spray is regulated by the EPA and federal law requires users and consumers of bear spray to deploy the product in a manner consistent with instructions on the label.

Unfortunately, there is an ever-increasing amount of conflicting information about the proper use of bear spray being produced in media reports, government websites and publications, and by special interest groups.  While the intent of these sources is to educate the public on how to effectively use bear spray, the unintended consequence has been consumer confusion and misunderstanding.  It is critically important to recognize that not all bear spray products perform in exactly the same manner, and the variability in performance characteristics across product lines makes it exceedingly difficult and counterproductive to develop a set of generic bear spray recommendations to apply across the board.

For example, some sources instruct users to “spray for 2-3 seconds” when the bear is approaching.  This instruction ignores the fact that not all bear sprays discharge the same amount of active ingredient per unit of time.  For instance, a one-second high-volume burst from a UDAP can may discharge the equivalent amount of active ingredient as a two- or three-second burst from another brand of bear spray.  UDAP’s EPA-approved instructions direct users to release a one-second burst of spray as an attacking bear is charging.  To instruct a UDAP user to unnecessarily deplete his or her canister with a two- to three-second spray is not only irresponsible and dangerous, it also encourages use of the spray in a manner inconsistent with its label.

Other sources instruct the use of a zig-zag pattern or a side-to-side movement while spraying.  This action is completely unnecessary for UDAP products, which have a broad spray pattern and are designed to billow outward in an expanding fog.  Using a side-to-side motion while spraying not only wastes bear spray product, it decreases the effective distance the spray will travel, as can be seen in this video.

Bear spray producers continually test their products and develop specific, EPA-approved instructions for how to most effectively deploy the spray given the canister’s specific performance characteristics.  Users should understand and follow the instructions printed on the label of their chosen bear spray product.

UDAP Bear Spray products

 

Please, tell me more about UDAP.

There are more people than ever recreating, hunting, fishing, and enjoying the wild lands of North America and elsewhere around the globe.  In many cases, they are doing so in the midst of prime grizzly/brown and black bear habitat, which has led to more conflicts among humans and bears than ever before.  With bear populations on the rise, the need for a reliable and effective bear deterrent is as important as ever.

At UDAP Industries, we provide our customers with bear spray and personal protection products that help keep people safe in bear country.  Our bear spray products are powerful and robust, with several sizes, including the largest can of bear spray on the market.  Our customers tell us that the power and reliability of our products is the reason that UDAP bear spray is one of the most trusted and relied upon bear spray products available in the marketplace.

UDAP produces three sizes of bear spray:

  • UDAP 7.9 oz. Bear Spray (sprays for approximately 4 seconds continuously)
  • UDAP 9.2 oz. Bear Spray (sprays for approximately 5.4 seconds continuously)
  • UDAP 13.4 oz. Bear Spray  (sprays for approximately 7 seconds continuously)

 

Be prepared, carry bear spray, read the label, and know how to use it.  Practice makes perfect sense.

For more information and bear safety tips visit www.BearSpray.com.

Hunting in Bear Country

Are you planning to go on a hunting trip in bear country? Obtaining the proper hunting equipment and understanding how to effectively use it can prevent a major threat to your life. Bears are a valuable species, but a number of people are afraid of them due to their nature. Understanding how a bear behaves will help hunters understand bears better, making it easier to protect yourself while hunting in bear country.

Hunt in the Right Season

Hunting season is upon us. Bears are extremely active in the fall as they are packing on as much food as possible for hibernation. It is easier to spot the bears in the fall since they are extremely active.

Hunting in Bear Country

Don’t Surprise a Bear

One of the reasons why bears often attack is because they are startled. Hunters are focused on being quiet, and they often forget about their own safety. A bear is a solitary animal who avoids people. Normally the bear will retreat if they see or hear a human. They normally strike when they are protecting their young or their territory. Bears are surprised easily, and they can strike when they are startled.

Recognize Bear Signs

It is important to learn how to recognize bear signs. While most hunters know how to track a bear, some people are unaware of basic signs including the following:

•    Identify bear claws on the trees

•    Search for fresh tracks

•    Avoid hunting on a windy day as your scent can carry several miles away, altering a bear you are in their area

•    Hunt in a group

Invest in Gear

One of the most important things you can do is invest in the right clothing and gear for hunting. Clothing you hunt in needs to help you blend in with the scents of the area. Cover your hands and wear clothing to reduce any personal odors. Hunting with others is beneficial as it too will help you to stay safe and obtain medical attention if you are injured.

After the Kill

Hunting and cleaning a carcass is a challenge that you need to carefully follow to prevent bears from attacking. A carcass should be stored about 15 feet above the ground so you do not hang it close to where bears can reach it. Never keep food around camp as it can attract bears.

Hunting in Bear Country

Take Precautions

It is important to focus on taking precautions before you go hunting. Learn the proper procedures to follow if you encounter a bear. The most important thing you need to remember is to stay calm. Slowly move away from the bear and give them a chance to identify you as a person that is not a threat. If the bear charges you, do not shoot. Most hunters panic when the bear is charging and they start shooting, simply wounding a bear and provoking them. The best option to use is to arm yourself with UDAP Bear Spray. Keep UDAP Bear Spray with you at all times, you never know when a bear might surprise you while you are hunting. With the right preparation and precautions, you can stay safe when you are hunting in bear country.

Duck Hunting In Wyoming

Duck hunting is a popular sport in Wyoming since there are many ducks in Wyoming. Duck hunting offers world class scenes which cannot only be matched anywhere in the world. From rice fields which are awesome in duck hunting, can also be matched with prime ducks places especially in the winter season. A guide can be an awesome aide especially for the first time duck hunters unless you are familiar with the Wyoming duck hunting area. If you prefer not to have a guide, you can simply ask them questions on your way to the duck hunting expedition.

Duck Hunting In Wyoming

Wondering around aimlessly is a waste of time and therefore finding a guide is the easiest way. Many hunters usually waste their time going to places where the ducks are not there. Guides help hunters avoid to the wrong target areas and direst them where the fun really is. In Wyoming, camouflage is a must have in duck hunting expeditions so that the ducks cannot recognize you. Most are water proof and hunters should not worry about any clogging that might happen. Finding the right boat is another top move for any hunters. The boats help in navigating the swampy Wyoming Rivers and streams which the ducks throng.

The boats come in different choices with regard to choices and style. They come in different styles as well which definitely suit any duck hunter in Wyoming. Finding the right boat is not difficult as some are well painted and others custom made to suit the hunter’s need. For those who are not out door sport hunters, they should try online duck hunting games. When one comes to play these online games, they develop and stimulate a life duck hunting experience and so hunters can sharpen their skills at home before playing with the real ducks. No kidding!!

Another tip about the boat that should be noted is the fact that hunters need to choose a boat that blends with the Wyoming scenery. Bright colors always alert the ducks and so could be a game changer if one decides to go duck hunting. These Wyoming duck hunting tips will definitely help any duck hunter visiting.

Duck Hunting In Wyoming

When you’re duck hunting in Wyoming, don’t forget your Bear Spray! Visit UDAP.com for all of your Bear Spray needs!

Bow Hunting Basics

Bow hunting is an historic activity that has been crucial to the development and survival of the human species. It has endured to be a well-respected sport in our society. If you are interested in becoming a bow hunter and unsure of where to start, this article will offer you beginner’s tips on equipment, licensure, and hunting procedures.

Bow Hunting Basics

Legal Procedures

The most important part of hunting is doing so legally. Hunting licenses are issued on a state by state basis, so you will most likely need to contact your state’s Department of Game. Once you have your hunting license, you need to look up when and where you are allowed to hunt, and how much you are allowed to kill, all of which are strictly regulated.

Choosing Your Equipment

Once you’ve taken care of your legalities, you can move on to actually hunting. There are two basic types of bow: the compound bow and the long or recurve bow. Long and recurve bows are more primitive, while compound bows are more modern and utilize pulleys to minimize the strength you need to draw back the string.

Compound bows are better for beginners since it’s easier to pull and hold the string on a compound. All bows are rated with a draw weight, so you need a good idea of your own strength and what you can handle when purchasing a bow.

Bow Hunting Basics

Scouting a Location

Deer are the primary target for most bow hunters. Many hunters scope out the area they plan to hunt for weeks in advance in order to find spots that are highly trafficked by deer. Once you have decided on a spot, you may want to invest in a tree stand. Tree stands give you a better vantage point of your surroundings, camouflage you from potential game, and make long periods of stillness more comfortable.

Safety and Field Dressing

You’ll also need to bring materials to navigate the forest and to clean and transport the deer. A flashlight and a map or compass are absolutely necessary when hunting in forested areas, solely for your own personal safety. You’ll also need materials to field dress your deer. Without field dressing, it’s possible that the deer meat will spoil due to its body temperature remaining high. Field dressing involves making a long incision down the deer’s belly, from the sternum to the pelvic area. You want to cut through the flesh but not harm the internal organs, which you will need to remove before transporting the deer. Once the carcass is dressed, use a long rope to haul it back.

This is a very basic overview of bow hunting. If you are serious about becoming a bow hunter, visit your local sporting goods or outdoor store and talk to an expert about your specific needs. For all of your Bear Spray needs please visit UDAP.com today!

Top 3 Places to Kayak in the US

Summer is finally here and what better way to enjoy it than by spending time in the outdoors. Kayaking is a fun activity that involves moving across water using paddles. People take up the sport because it is fun, it is a great way to exercise and also allows one or a group of people to be close to nature. There are many ideal water bodies across the country for kayaking but some are top notch and have the best reviews.

The Top Best Places to Kayak in the US

Glacier Bay in Alaska is adored as a great kayaking location. It features a protected 3.28 million-acre national park that has countless fjords and bays for large scale kayaking. In 1794, the Glacier Bay was filled with ice 100 miles long and 20 miles wide. The ice was about 4,000 feet thick. The glacier has since retreated by 65 miles providing a large area for kayaking. Sea kayaking is a great way to enjoy this bay with trips starting at Bartlett Cover. Reservations should be made early and in advance because of the large influx of people wanting to visit the bay. Before attending, kayakers are required to attend an orientation class. It is intended to answer questions that the person may have, inform the kayakers of the wildlife in the area, and closures that are not accessible during the trip.

Top 3 Places to Kayak in the US

Baja in California has been praised as a must place to visit for kayaking. The sunsets in this region are beautiful and the air is warm in most months of the year. When kayaking, visitors are given the opportunity to try Stand up paddle boards. The location is beautiful with reefs and is full of sea wildlife. The water is also warm which makes kayaking fun and comfortable. There is a whale migration that happens every January and starts from the Bering Sea and head out 5,000 miles out.

Top 3 Places to Kayak in the US

The Acadia National Park in Maine is another top spot for kayaking in the US. The park features a water trail that was created in 1993. It offers visitors a chance to explore areas on the over 3,000 miles of coastlines and islands. There are campsites so people can relive their kayaking moments even the next day.

Top 3 Places to Kayak in the US

Gone Fishin’: Best Places for Flyfishing in Montana

In the back woods of Big Sky Country, sportsmen have found a flyfishing paradise in the secret nooks and crannies of Montana’s wilds. Over the years, the secret to the best fishing spots have spread, and Montana has developed a reputation for some of the best flyfishing in the country. The vast amount of blue river waters, stretching for hundreds of miles, all over the states, ensure that anglers are able to spread out and have their own piece of the water in any of the popular flows.

Big Horn River

Located near the Prior Mountains in southern Montana, the Big Horn River is known for its productive waters, given a year-round insect season which draws in the catch. During peak fishing times, the average catch is around 17 inches. In the fall and winter the crowds may wane, but the fishing lives on, with most sportsmen suggesting streamer flies suggesting minnows, which are the most successful at attracting brown trout migrating down the river. The Big Horn is well-known around the world for having the highest concentration of trout than in any other North American river.

Gone Fishin': Best Places for Flyfishing in Montana

Yellowstone River

Yellowstone, one of the greatest national parks in the U.S. is what many have argues is the epicenter of the best trout fishing on the globe. The mighty Yellowstone River, has produced some of the best catches around, with more than 100 miles of fishable river. Some fishermen have been known to use drift boats or white water rafts, equipped with fly fishing equipment. Some of the most common catches include Cuthroats, and Big Browns, many exceeding 20 inches. Pre-run off, usually March to April is one of the best times to real in these monsters. In August, it’s easy to fish up hoppers and pre-spawn Brown Trout.

Gone Fishin': Best Places for Flyfishing in Montana

Tailwater Rivers

Another great place for flyfishing runs the course of the Tailwater Rivers, which include the Missouri and Lower Madison rivers. In the Spring, anglers experience an excellent hatching of Midges and Blue Winged Olives, leading to a plentiful feast for the fish who roam these waters. On particularly cloudy days, fishermen can experience some of the best streamer catches in the area. The average catch on the Missouri is around 18-20 inches, but have commonly come in around 30 inches. The Missouri also boasts a dense population of large Brown Trout, and produces great fishing action from April to October

Gone Fishin': Best Places for Flyfishing in Montana

Benefits of Fly Fishing in Alaska

Fly fishing in Alaska is plenty of fun for the avid outdoorsman. If you like to fish, there is a huge opportunity to catch many types of fish in Alaska. Fly fishing can be enjoyed in various regions of Alaska and the choices seem to be limitless. There are oceans, lakes, streams, and rivers in most parts of Alaska. The fact that there is salt water and fresh water fishing areas available all over the state makes it possible to catch a wide variety of fish in different environments.

Tips for Alaskan Flyfishing

Flyfishing in Alaska can be done successfully with some tips and tricks. It doesn’t have to be frustrating for the first-time flyfisherman in Alaska. Depending on the type of water that you want to fish in, there are ways to make it easier and ensure that fishing will be bountiful. It simply requires some useful tips and knowledge to be successful at flyfishing in Alaska.

For those that like to fish in streams and rivers, there can seem to be an overabundance of other fishermen. Some of the more popular streams and rivers have this issue. It can make it seem as though the fish are scared to bite. However, there are a couple of tips to help you. Using patterns that are subdued and minimized can be helpful in these busy areas. Make sure to have smaller sizes in your flyfishing gear in case this strategy is needed.

Although flyfishing in the ocean is less popular, there are those that enjoy it immensely and are quite successful at catching the many different species in the ocean’s saltwater. Some of the best places to catch saltwater fish species is in the-inter tidal areas around mouths of rivers and streams. Many fishermen report catching plenty of Pacific salmon in those spots along the river mouths and streams that are filled with waters and fish from the ocean.

There are still bodies of water in Alaska. The still bodies of water are typically ponds and lakes. Having the right equipment can help access these waters and fish. The use of a canoe or a kick boats is common. Sometimes access to still waters is difficult, often requiring navigation through forests that requires creative traveling. Bears can be a concern in the forest area and having bear spray is recommended at all times, no matter where in Alaska one is fishing. You may also want to try the UDAP Bear Spray Backpack!

Benefits of Fly Fishing in Alaska

Once you have found some great fishing spots to enjoy the sport, there are some tips that can make it easier. Knowing some methods that will make fly fishing more fruitful can help. Removing the hook on a fish that is large can be a challenge but it can be done easier. One tip is to turn the fish upside down and this results in the fish not struggling because it becomes disoriented. This makes it much easier to remove the hook and results in less injury to a catch. Having good knot methods for fly fishing in Alaska is helpful as well. A useful tip is to use an open clinch knot as it is one of the most effective knots for anglers. Also, don’t forget to carry UDAP bear spray because Alaska is known for having a large bear population in and around its lakes, forests, and streams.

Benefits of Fly Fishing in Alaska

Four Tips to Prepare Anyone for Any Hike

Hiking is a fun past time that brings out the most adventurous at heart who wish to experience complete nature submersion, as well as physical challenges that promote a healthy lifestyle. While it may be tempting to just take off into nature, there are some important tips that can help you enjoy your time hiking even more. With some attention to some key details, you can be sure to have a fun and safe hike.

Four Tips to Prepare Anyone for Any Hike

Plan Ahead

Hiking is something that like the boy scouts, you need to be prepared for. Research what each trail consists of before venturing down it, so that you know what you are up against, and are able to bring the proper equipment, according to the Grand Canyon National Park Service. Plenty of water is essential for any hike. It is also important to bring energy boosting snacks. An extra supply is also a good idea, in case of an emergency. One should also be aware of the weather, and make sure to dress appropriately and wear sunscreen. When venturing out on a hike, use the buddy system and to try not to hike alone. Hats, UDAP Bear Spray Backpack, non-cotton clothing, bandanas, ID, healthcare cared, and credit card, and a first aid kit with a fire starting mechanism are useful tools to have when embarking on a long hike.

Four Tips to Prepare Anyone for Any Hike

Leave No Trace

When you are enjoying nature, and the unspoiled natural environment you are in, it is important to leave the environment in the condition in which you found it, according to Alexander Davies of Discovery News. With the exception of picking up human waste and litter left behind by former hikers, it is best to leave the natural habitat as it is. If rock piles are discovered, you should leave them be. You should not carve out new trails, or destroy living matter. You should not do anything that would cause the natural living organisms of the wild to experience any difficulties; causing them to become sick, or even die. This is to ensure that the cherished natural spaces remain in such a state for future generations to come. You must be respectful of nature, and do all that is possible to reduce their impact and footprint upon it. It is as beautiful as it is still because of its lack of human inhabitation.

Have the Proper Gear

In addition to the above-mentioned food, water, and clothing, you should be sure to carry a compass, pocketknife and map. If the hike takes place where the weather gets cold, it is best to bring warm clothing. When camping overnight, it is key to have really great gear such as a UDAP Bear Spray, tent, camping pad, sleeping back, backpack, etc. These can aid in your survival, not matter how rough the conditions.

Be Cognizant of Wild Animals

You may encounter a wild animal, or several during a hike, make sure that you are carrying your UDAP Bear Spray. Be sure to research the wild animals of the area that you are going to be hiking in, as well as studying these animals, and the ways in which you should interact when faced with such a confrontation. Be respectful of the animals and know which plants are edible, as well as which insects, spiders, and snakes are poisonous.

Four Tips to Prepare Anyone for Any Hike

Having the best hiking equipment can aid in preparations for what is ahead. Protection from harmful forces is greater when the equipment used is of the highest quality.

Fly Cast Fishing in Montana

Fishing season is just around the corner and one of my favorite places in Montana to fish is the scenic Gallatin Valley near Bozeman, Montana.  They are truly blessed with hundreds of miles of blue ribbon trout water.  Those waters include, but are not limited to, the Yellowstone, Gallatin, Bighorn, Jefferson, Stillwater, Boulder and Missouri rivers.  Let’s don’t forget the world renowned spring creeks in Paradise Valley, as well as some lesser known but equally amazing spring creeks and lakes in that area. Fly Cast Fishing at its best.

Fly Cast Fishing in Montana
UDAP chest holster
is a great product and works well for Fly Cast Fishermen or anyone fishing and enjoying the great outdoors.  UDAP Pepper Power holsters are designed for an individual to have instant and silent access to the canister. Every UDAP holster is designer for bear spray to shoot right from the holster if time does not allow you to draw it.

Fly Cast Fishing in Montana
Before you head out the door, make sure that you are doing more than just carrying your Bear Spray! Make sure that you know how to use it. Practice using it. It took practice to learn how to catch those blue ribbon trout and the same is true for using Bear Spray properly. Practice, practice, practice! Now go enjoy that great Montana Flyfishing!

Bear Spray vs. Bullets

Even though the Chicago Bears didn’t get in the Super Bowl XLVIII, the game between, bear spray vs bullets,  has already been played and won. The winner is bear spray hands down! The firearm team played a good game and they believe that a person needs a hand gun or rifle to stop an angry bear. But the pro bear spray team has been adamant that bear spray works.

Bear Spray vs Bullets

And the bear spray team won this super bowl, but we don’t want you to take our word for it, in a recent study done by Tom S. Smith, Stephen Herrero, Terry D. Debruyn and James M. Wilder bear spray lead its team to victory.

The Results of Bear Spray vs a Firearm

Bear incidents involving 175 persons resulted in 3 injuries, all minor (less than 2% injury rate). Firearms incidents involving 478 persons resulted in 17 fatalities (15%), 25 severe injuries (22%), 42 suffered moderate injury (37%), 29 suffered slight injuries (26%), for a total 113 injuries (24% injury rate). Hence firearm users experienced 12 times the injury rate of those using bear spray!

Of the 71 cases where persons sprayed bears to defend themselves, 14% (10 to 71) of users reported the spray having had negative side effects upon themselves, ranging from minor irritation (11%, 8 of 71) to near incapacitation (3%, 2 of 71).

Firearm failures were identified in 100 firearm cases, where users reported mechanical or physical issues with the use of a firearm, including lack of time (32%), unable to use firearm due to situation, such as having your partner in your line of fire (21%), mechanical issues (11%), safety/holster issues (95), insufficient caliber/no bullets left (9%), distance to bear (8%), missed bear (6%), or tripped and fell (4%).

No bears were injured in conflicts involving bear spray, however, 23 bears were wounded and 176 killed in incidents involving firearms.


Why bear spray is the winner…

Bear Deterrent Pepper Spray
works better in a bear attack situation because of its ease of use. Aiming is not a big factor like it is with a firearm and you are not relying on a bullet to stop the bear by hitting it in a vital spot. Even when this is the case, sometimes the bear can advance and attack if it does not expire right away. This can actually work against the gun user as now you have a wounded bear and this may intensify the attack. With bear spray you’re not stopping the bear with pain necessarily. You might think this as it really is painful to be sprayed. However, what you’re really doing is taking away the bears senses. The bear’s sight is impaired, but more importantly its breathing and sense of smell are blasted away by the spray. Anyone that has ever been hit with a fog pattern pepper spray can tell you how difficult it is to breathe when sprayed. It actually can be like a shot to the head, since the bear navigates primarily with its nose. For a bear, this is certainly the case. The bear will have no idea what is happening and this changes the behavior the bear was displaying prior to being sprayed.

When you use bear pepper spray you’ve truly have the home field advantage! GO UDAP BEAR PEPPER SPRAY!