Campsite Safety

Bears rarely enter occupied tents or wreck entire campsites, but, when they do, it is most often because the people camping in that camp site or at a nearby site, have not taken appropriate cautions to ensure that they have a proper clean camp. If there is even one scrap of food for the bear to access in the camp it will most likely search the rest of the camp and the surrounding area for more food. A bear’s sense of smell is over two thousand times greater then a human’s and, even seven times greater then a bloodhounds. They are thought to have one of the best, if not the best, olfactory senses on the entire planet. Every year camper’s leave out bits of dinner on picnic tables; they try to burn what they haven’t eaten in the fire; or they keep, in general, an unclean camp. While it is hard to help others to be responsible, here are a few tips for keeping a clean camp so that you can ensure that you are doing your part to not lure in potential bears into your camp or into someone else’s.

Proper food storage is very important to keeping a clean camp. Your food should be sealed in containers (preferably bear proof containers), and, if you are car camping, possibly leave it in the car near your campsite. Never store any of these things inside the tent. Food and even items like deodorant should never be kept within the tent. You don’t want to give the bear a reason to come over to inspect your tent, if, indeed, one has merely wandered into camp. If you are cooking foods that have strong smells – sausages or bacon and eggs – make sure to cook the food quite away from your camp. Bears cant resist the smell of sausage and bacon any more then you can, so having those odors as far away from where you sleep as possible is vitally important to preventing a possible encounter. Also, many developed campgrounds now use bear proof garbage bins. Make sure that if you have garbage, do not leave it in a garbage bag, dangling from a nearby picnic table overnight. Throw it away. While we cannot prevent bears from wandering into a campsite, we can prevent them from lingering, and, possibly, destroying our camp or being aggressive towards us or our neighboring campsite.

Bear Shock electric phone

Another option is to use the UDAP Bear Shock fence at your campground site for protection from Bears.

Autumn Means Hunting Season

Autumn Means Hunting Season

While autumn in many places marks the end of a busy summer and a transition to the winter, fall in the west means busy mountain ranges, busy rivers, and intense flights of migratory birds. Hunters begin to hit the mountain slopes in full camo in the archery season, and the bright orange jackets of rifle season eventually take over. Anglers flock to the big rivers for the intense hatches of mayflies and October caddis. Later, in mid October, hunters in camo, with Labradors or Chesapeake Bay Retrievers, maybe even Springer Spaniels, will throw duck decoys out onto a river or pond, and create the calls of a hen mallard, while hiding on the bank, shotgun at the ready. Hunters will produce enormous flocks of goose decoys in fields of corn stubble or cut alfalfa, hiding in lay out blinds or ditches, using silhouettes, shells, or intricately carved full body goose decoys to lure in giant Canadian Honkers. Another important aspect of the fall is intense color. The greens of spring and summer give way to the yellowing leaves and grasses of fall and the colors combine with dramatic complexity.

The trees of fall are the obvious choice of dramatic color. A person only has to drive the banks of a western river with the bright yellow leaves of Cottonwood trees, offset by the bright, clear water of the river, to realize just how special of a time of year fall is. Also, in areas of the west that have dense stands of Aspen trees, the cloud of intense yellow that these trees present is inspiring. In the fall another landscape color that can cause serious drama is white. When the first snows cover the peaks of the mountains; the views of the mountains are juxtaposed with the greens and yellows of the valleys.

Some game animals of the west also exhibit intense color. Mallard drakes, for instance, have come out of their drab molt of summer, and the green feathers about its head are bright and intense. Brown Trout seem to absorb the yellow leaves that fall into the river and their scales turn bright yellow to gold in full spawning colors.

Backpacking in Remote Areas

Backpacking into remote areas of the west is both fun and rewarding. There are many challenges the hiker can face on a pack trip, and he should always be prepared to encounter anything from unpredictable weather, injury, or even an encounter with a bear. One way that a hiker can be more prepared is to properly load his pack, and also to have his pack fastened correctly about his upper body so that the pack is merely an extension of him. Remember, in the backcountry, your backpack is your lifeline; it is responsible for protecting your food, shelter, and clothing.

backpacking-UDAP Bear Spray

A hiking backpack should not be worn like a school child’s pack. The hiking backpack is meant to carry much of the load of the pack on the hips and not on the shoulders. When you put on your pack, adjust the shoulder straps first, as this will lift the pack into position over your hips. Then tighten down the waistbelt. The waistbelt needs to be tight, but not so tight that it cuts off the circulation to your legs. The load straps should be tightened to a forty-five degree angle. If these straps are cinched in tight it will pull the shoulder straps of the pack into your skin.

While there is no one absolute correct way to load a backpack, there are some basic guidelines that will ensure that the load in the pack will travel comfortably throughout the hike. First of all, place the items that you wont need until you camp like light clothing, and a sleeping bag and pad in the bottom of the pack. If you are hiking in bear country make sure to keep items like toothpaste, food, or even sunscreen away from these items that you will be using at night. Bears have a very keen sense of smell, and you do not want the smell of these items in the tent with you at night. Above the lighter items, you will want your heaviest items. These items ideally should be loaded close to your spine in the middle of your back. The Food, water supply, and stove can all be placed in this area of the pack. You can place your tent, rain jacket, and other soft necessities that you may need in an emergency around the heavy items to prevent any possible shifting.

backpacking-UDAP Bear proof container

Another option is a UDAP Bear Proof Food Container for storing food from bears.

 

Bear Smart Communities

Bear Smart Communities

Building a bear-smart community refers to the act of effectively overseeing and limiting the things that attract bears into the community, managing human activities, and establishing policies and practices for non-lethal bear control techniques. While building a bear-smart community is a multifaceted task that requires strategy and hard work, here are some tips that can help you along the way to making your community bear-smart:

Conduct a Bear Hazard Assessment

Your first step in building a bear-smart community should be conducting a bear hazard assessment that will provide you with the information you need regarding where the bear problem is and what (species of bear) you’re dealing with. During your bear hazard assessment, you should identify potential human-bear conflicts and conflict zones, and start to think about bear control recommendations.

Put in Place a Plan

After a hazard assessment has been completed, you should use the information gathered from the assessment to formulate and implement a bear management plan. Putting together a plan can be hard work, and will require the cooperation of multiple agencies. The plan should highlight the roles of different organizations and agencies, and how bears will be managed if they do wander into town.

Bear Smart Communities

Education – Be Smart, Be Safe

One of the biggest aspects of building a bear-smart community is to educate community members about the hazards of bears and how to avoid attracting bears. Part of being bear-smart includes:

•    Properly throwing away garbage (especially food).

•    Avoiding using bird feeder during bear season.

•    Keeping lawns and yards in tip-top shape (bears love to eat dandelions and clover).

•    Keeping your car clean and free from food or anything else that might smell tempting to a bear.

•    Securing your home by keeping windows and doors closed to prevent the smell of food from wafting outdoors.

•    Using a bear-proof composter.

•    Not using citronella (the scent attracts bears).

•    Washing your barbeque grill after use.

•    Feeding pets, and keeping pet food, indoors.

•    Harvesting veggies as they ripen, as vegetables like carrots in a garden will attract bears.

•    Thinking about using electric fencing to keep bears off of property if you have a garden, chicken coops, or fruit-bearing trees or bushes.

In addition to managing properties, part of community education should include what to do while on trails and in campsites. Community members should watch out for bears while hiking, keep dogs on leaches, hike in groups rather than solo, never leave food in campgrounds, and pay attention to posted signs about bear activity.

By following the tips listed above, you’ll be well on your way to establishing a bear-safe community.

Visit our website for a UDAP Bear Fence or UDAP Bear Spray!

Bear Smart Communities

Top 3 Places to Kayak in the US

Summer is finally here and what better way to enjoy it than by spending time in the outdoors. Kayaking is a fun activity that involves moving across water using paddles. People take up the sport because it is fun, it is a great way to exercise and also allows one or a group of people to be close to nature. There are many ideal water bodies across the country for kayaking but some are top notch and have the best reviews.

The Top Best Places to Kayak in the US

Glacier Bay in Alaska is adored as a great kayaking location. It features a protected 3.28 million-acre national park that has countless fjords and bays for large scale kayaking. In 1794, the Glacier Bay was filled with ice 100 miles long and 20 miles wide. The ice was about 4,000 feet thick. The glacier has since retreated by 65 miles providing a large area for kayaking. Sea kayaking is a great way to enjoy this bay with trips starting at Bartlett Cover. Reservations should be made early and in advance because of the large influx of people wanting to visit the bay. Before attending, kayakers are required to attend an orientation class. It is intended to answer questions that the person may have, inform the kayakers of the wildlife in the area, and closures that are not accessible during the trip.

Top 3 Places to Kayak in the US

Baja in California has been praised as a must place to visit for kayaking. The sunsets in this region are beautiful and the air is warm in most months of the year. When kayaking, visitors are given the opportunity to try Stand up paddle boards. The location is beautiful with reefs and is full of sea wildlife. The water is also warm which makes kayaking fun and comfortable. There is a whale migration that happens every January and starts from the Bering Sea and head out 5,000 miles out.

Top 3 Places to Kayak in the US

The Acadia National Park in Maine is another top spot for kayaking in the US. The park features a water trail that was created in 1993. It offers visitors a chance to explore areas on the over 3,000 miles of coastlines and islands. There are campsites so people can relive their kayaking moments even the next day.

Top 3 Places to Kayak in the US

Gone Fishin’: Best Places for Flyfishing in Montana

In the back woods of Big Sky Country, sportsmen have found a flyfishing paradise in the secret nooks and crannies of Montana’s wilds. Over the years, the secret to the best fishing spots have spread, and Montana has developed a reputation for some of the best flyfishing in the country. The vast amount of blue river waters, stretching for hundreds of miles, all over the states, ensure that anglers are able to spread out and have their own piece of the water in any of the popular flows.

Big Horn River

Located near the Prior Mountains in southern Montana, the Big Horn River is known for its productive waters, given a year-round insect season which draws in the catch. During peak fishing times, the average catch is around 17 inches. In the fall and winter the crowds may wane, but the fishing lives on, with most sportsmen suggesting streamer flies suggesting minnows, which are the most successful at attracting brown trout migrating down the river. The Big Horn is well-known around the world for having the highest concentration of trout than in any other North American river.

Gone Fishin': Best Places for Flyfishing in Montana

Yellowstone River

Yellowstone, one of the greatest national parks in the U.S. is what many have argues is the epicenter of the best trout fishing on the globe. The mighty Yellowstone River, has produced some of the best catches around, with more than 100 miles of fishable river. Some fishermen have been known to use drift boats or white water rafts, equipped with fly fishing equipment. Some of the most common catches include Cuthroats, and Big Browns, many exceeding 20 inches. Pre-run off, usually March to April is one of the best times to real in these monsters. In August, it’s easy to fish up hoppers and pre-spawn Brown Trout.

Gone Fishin': Best Places for Flyfishing in Montana

Tailwater Rivers

Another great place for flyfishing runs the course of the Tailwater Rivers, which include the Missouri and Lower Madison rivers. In the Spring, anglers experience an excellent hatching of Midges and Blue Winged Olives, leading to a plentiful feast for the fish who roam these waters. On particularly cloudy days, fishermen can experience some of the best streamer catches in the area. The average catch on the Missouri is around 18-20 inches, but have commonly come in around 30 inches. The Missouri also boasts a dense population of large Brown Trout, and produces great fishing action from April to October

Gone Fishin': Best Places for Flyfishing in Montana

Benefits of Fly Fishing in Alaska

Fly fishing in Alaska is plenty of fun for the avid outdoorsman. If you like to fish, there is a huge opportunity to catch many types of fish in Alaska. Fly fishing can be enjoyed in various regions of Alaska and the choices seem to be limitless. There are oceans, lakes, streams, and rivers in most parts of Alaska. The fact that there is salt water and fresh water fishing areas available all over the state makes it possible to catch a wide variety of fish in different environments.

Tips for Alaskan Flyfishing

Flyfishing in Alaska can be done successfully with some tips and tricks. It doesn’t have to be frustrating for the first-time flyfisherman in Alaska. Depending on the type of water that you want to fish in, there are ways to make it easier and ensure that fishing will be bountiful. It simply requires some useful tips and knowledge to be successful at flyfishing in Alaska.

For those that like to fish in streams and rivers, there can seem to be an overabundance of other fishermen. Some of the more popular streams and rivers have this issue. It can make it seem as though the fish are scared to bite. However, there are a couple of tips to help you. Using patterns that are subdued and minimized can be helpful in these busy areas. Make sure to have smaller sizes in your flyfishing gear in case this strategy is needed.

Although flyfishing in the ocean is less popular, there are those that enjoy it immensely and are quite successful at catching the many different species in the ocean’s saltwater. Some of the best places to catch saltwater fish species is in the-inter tidal areas around mouths of rivers and streams. Many fishermen report catching plenty of Pacific salmon in those spots along the river mouths and streams that are filled with waters and fish from the ocean.

There are still bodies of water in Alaska. The still bodies of water are typically ponds and lakes. Having the right equipment can help access these waters and fish. The use of a canoe or a kick boats is common. Sometimes access to still waters is difficult, often requiring navigation through forests that requires creative traveling. Bears can be a concern in the forest area and having bear spray is recommended at all times, no matter where in Alaska one is fishing. You may also want to try the UDAP Bear Spray Backpack!

Benefits of Fly Fishing in Alaska

Once you have found some great fishing spots to enjoy the sport, there are some tips that can make it easier. Knowing some methods that will make fly fishing more fruitful can help. Removing the hook on a fish that is large can be a challenge but it can be done easier. One tip is to turn the fish upside down and this results in the fish not struggling because it becomes disoriented. This makes it much easier to remove the hook and results in less injury to a catch. Having good knot methods for fly fishing in Alaska is helpful as well. A useful tip is to use an open clinch knot as it is one of the most effective knots for anglers. Also, don’t forget to carry UDAP bear spray because Alaska is known for having a large bear population in and around its lakes, forests, and streams.

Benefits of Fly Fishing in Alaska

Four Tips to Prepare Anyone for Any Hike

Hiking is a fun past time that brings out the most adventurous at heart who wish to experience complete nature submersion, as well as physical challenges that promote a healthy lifestyle. While it may be tempting to just take off into nature, there are some important tips that can help you enjoy your time hiking even more. With some attention to some key details, you can be sure to have a fun and safe hike.

Four Tips to Prepare Anyone for Any Hike

Plan Ahead

Hiking is something that like the boy scouts, you need to be prepared for. Research what each trail consists of before venturing down it, so that you know what you are up against, and are able to bring the proper equipment, according to the Grand Canyon National Park Service. Plenty of water is essential for any hike. It is also important to bring energy boosting snacks. An extra supply is also a good idea, in case of an emergency. One should also be aware of the weather, and make sure to dress appropriately and wear sunscreen. When venturing out on a hike, use the buddy system and to try not to hike alone. Hats, UDAP Bear Spray Backpack, non-cotton clothing, bandanas, ID, healthcare cared, and credit card, and a first aid kit with a fire starting mechanism are useful tools to have when embarking on a long hike.

Four Tips to Prepare Anyone for Any Hike

Leave No Trace

When you are enjoying nature, and the unspoiled natural environment you are in, it is important to leave the environment in the condition in which you found it, according to Alexander Davies of Discovery News. With the exception of picking up human waste and litter left behind by former hikers, it is best to leave the natural habitat as it is. If rock piles are discovered, you should leave them be. You should not carve out new trails, or destroy living matter. You should not do anything that would cause the natural living organisms of the wild to experience any difficulties; causing them to become sick, or even die. This is to ensure that the cherished natural spaces remain in such a state for future generations to come. You must be respectful of nature, and do all that is possible to reduce their impact and footprint upon it. It is as beautiful as it is still because of its lack of human inhabitation.

Have the Proper Gear

In addition to the above-mentioned food, water, and clothing, you should be sure to carry a compass, pocketknife and map. If the hike takes place where the weather gets cold, it is best to bring warm clothing. When camping overnight, it is key to have really great gear such as a UDAP Bear Spray, tent, camping pad, sleeping back, backpack, etc. These can aid in your survival, not matter how rough the conditions.

Be Cognizant of Wild Animals

You may encounter a wild animal, or several during a hike, make sure that you are carrying your UDAP Bear Spray. Be sure to research the wild animals of the area that you are going to be hiking in, as well as studying these animals, and the ways in which you should interact when faced with such a confrontation. Be respectful of the animals and know which plants are edible, as well as which insects, spiders, and snakes are poisonous.

Four Tips to Prepare Anyone for Any Hike

Having the best hiking equipment can aid in preparations for what is ahead. Protection from harmful forces is greater when the equipment used is of the highest quality.

The Difference between a Black Bear and a Grizzly Bear

Have you ever wondered what the differences between a black bear and a grizzly bear are? One major difference is the size. Size can vary depending on the age and gender of the bear. An adult black bear can be larger than a sub-adult (juvenile) grizzly bear. Size can also vary among geographic areas, as well.
Please note that there are many physical indicators between a black bear and a grizzly bear: and they vary with sex and age, so size is also not a reliable indicator. Identifying the type of bear that you see is important for your safety and to protect bears. When you know if it’s a grizzly or a black bear, you can then decide on the best actions to take.

The Difference between a Black Bear and a Grizzly Bearbear spray

Don’t forget to always carry your UDAPBear Deterrent!

The Difference between a Black Bear and a Grizzly Bear

Travel Safely in Bear Country

Here is a list for traveling safely in Bear Country!

  1. Where should I keep my food?
  • UDAPmakes bear electric fences for the backcountry including electric fences for food storage and camping. Keep the bears out with BearShock!
  • don’t leave pet food or garbage in areas where bears can get to it.
  • Place garbage in a heavy duty-duty, tied bag. Put the bag inside a garbage can with a bear-proof lid.
  • Beehives attract bears. If you have hives put them up high on hear-proof platforms.

Travel Safely in Bear Country

Keep your food and equipment safe In Bear Country!

  1. How should people visiting bear country behave

Bears are typically afraid and nervous around people. They will avoid humans. Bears may attack people when they feel threatened or surprised or when forced to defend themselves, their cubs, or their food. You should be careful to avoid all bears. Here are some specific tips:

  • Make noise, let bears know you’re there.
  • Travel in groups. Groups are noisier and there is safety in numbers.
  • Keep your dog on a leash at all times.
  • Stick to worn paths and trails and hike during the day, not at night.
  • Watch for bears for signs of them, including bear tracks and droppings.
  • Avoid areas where you spot potential bear food.
  • Don’t forget to carry your UDAP BEAR SPRAY!