Campsite Safety

Bears rarely enter occupied tents or wreck entire campsites, but, when they do, it is most often because the people camping in that camp site or at a nearby site, have not taken appropriate cautions to ensure that they have a proper clean camp. If there is even one scrap of food for the bear to access in the camp it will most likely search the rest of the camp and the surrounding area for more food. A bear’s sense of smell is over two thousand times greater then a human’s and, even seven times greater then a bloodhounds. They are thought to have one of the best, if not the best, olfactory senses on the entire planet. Every year camper’s leave out bits of dinner on picnic tables; they try to burn what they haven’t eaten in the fire; or they keep, in general, an unclean camp. While it is hard to help others to be responsible, here are a few tips for keeping a clean camp so that you can ensure that you are doing your part to not lure in potential bears into your camp or into someone else’s.

Proper food storage is very important to keeping a clean camp. Your food should be sealed in containers (preferably bear proof containers), and, if you are car camping, possibly leave it in the car near your campsite. Never store any of these things inside the tent. Food and even items like deodorant should never be kept within the tent. You don’t want to give the bear a reason to come over to inspect your tent, if, indeed, one has merely wandered into camp. If you are cooking foods that have strong smells – sausages or bacon and eggs – make sure to cook the food quite away from your camp. Bears cant resist the smell of sausage and bacon any more then you can, so having those odors as far away from where you sleep as possible is vitally important to preventing a possible encounter. Also, many developed campgrounds now use bear proof garbage bins. Make sure that if you have garbage, do not leave it in a garbage bag, dangling from a nearby picnic table overnight. Throw it away. While we cannot prevent bears from wandering into a campsite, we can prevent them from lingering, and, possibly, destroying our camp or being aggressive towards us or our neighboring campsite.

Bear Shock electric phone

Another option is to use the UDAP Bear Shock fence at your campground site for protection from Bears.

Hiking and Backpacking With a Dog Safety Tips

Bear Shock electric phone, Hiking and Backpacking With a Dog Safety Tips

Hiking and backpack camping with dogs is enjoyable. Dogs are excellent companions in the backcountry, although dogs can also pose several problems for backpackers and hikers. One major issue when you are in the backcountry with a dog is that it can create an encounter with a bear.   For instance, If a dog is sleeping in a tent with their human companions, they may be carrying several interesting smells on their coat that bears may find interesting. However it is a very rare occurrence for a bear to invade a tent, and, when they do, it is usually because of left out food scraps or an unkept camp.Be sure to use the UDAP Bear Shock fence at your campground site for protection from bears.

Bear Shock electric phone, Hiking and Backpacking With a Dog Safety Tips

If you do run into a bear out on the trail, a dog may be tempted to run after the bear, barking, and the bear may feel that it has to defend itself. Dog’s can be great instigators of trouble, although when the bear charges the dog, or attacks the dog, the dog is going to run back to you, and he will be bringing the scared, angry bear with him. An encounter like this is completely preventable, by placing a leash on the dog when you are out on the trail.

If you are going to be traveling in bear country with your dogs, leash them, but also give them a job to perform. Dogs can carry their own food and, possibly, other supplies on their backs. Keep the load light, though, dogs should not be required to haul too much weight on the trail. There are even backpacks built exclusively for dogs. If the dog is required to carry important supplies, then they should be leashed. A hot, tired dog isn’t going to consider the load on his back when he sees a wide, muddy puddle or a deep, pristine mountain lake. A dog carrying sleeping bags should be leashed, at least until the backpack is removed.

Dogs do make excellent companions on the trail. Unlike some of your friends at the bottom of your call list, the dog will not complain out on trail. Dogs can also sense possible dangers long before their human counterparts, and dogs may sense that cow moose around the bend, or the rattlesnake coiled at the other side of the log. Although, proper precautions should be taken, when hiking and backpacking with dogs in bear country.

Bear Smart Communities

Bear Smart Communities

Building a bear-smart community refers to the act of effectively overseeing and limiting the things that attract bears into the community, managing human activities, and establishing policies and practices for non-lethal bear control techniques. While building a bear-smart community is a multifaceted task that requires strategy and hard work, here are some tips that can help you along the way to making your community bear-smart:

Conduct a Bear Hazard Assessment

Your first step in building a bear-smart community should be conducting a bear hazard assessment that will provide you with the information you need regarding where the bear problem is and what (species of bear) you’re dealing with. During your bear hazard assessment, you should identify potential human-bear conflicts and conflict zones, and start to think about bear control recommendations.

Put in Place a Plan

After a hazard assessment has been completed, you should use the information gathered from the assessment to formulate and implement a bear management plan. Putting together a plan can be hard work, and will require the cooperation of multiple agencies. The plan should highlight the roles of different organizations and agencies, and how bears will be managed if they do wander into town.

Bear Smart Communities

Education – Be Smart, Be Safe

One of the biggest aspects of building a bear-smart community is to educate community members about the hazards of bears and how to avoid attracting bears. Part of being bear-smart includes:

•    Properly throwing away garbage (especially food).

•    Avoiding using bird feeder during bear season.

•    Keeping lawns and yards in tip-top shape (bears love to eat dandelions and clover).

•    Keeping your car clean and free from food or anything else that might smell tempting to a bear.

•    Securing your home by keeping windows and doors closed to prevent the smell of food from wafting outdoors.

•    Using a bear-proof composter.

•    Not using citronella (the scent attracts bears).

•    Washing your barbeque grill after use.

•    Feeding pets, and keeping pet food, indoors.

•    Harvesting veggies as they ripen, as vegetables like carrots in a garden will attract bears.

•    Thinking about using electric fencing to keep bears off of property if you have a garden, chicken coops, or fruit-bearing trees or bushes.

In addition to managing properties, part of community education should include what to do while on trails and in campsites. Community members should watch out for bears while hiking, keep dogs on leaches, hike in groups rather than solo, never leave food in campgrounds, and pay attention to posted signs about bear activity.

By following the tips listed above, you’ll be well on your way to establishing a bear-safe community.

Visit our website for a UDAP Bear Fence or UDAP Bear Spray!

Bear Smart Communities

Mistakes Made in The Great Outdoors

Hiking, camping and backpacking are all excellent ways to experience the wonder of the Great Outdoors. However, it can also be a dangerous way to witness Mother Nature in all her fury. Simple common mistakes made hastily can have inconvenient and even disastrous consequences. Here we explore some common mistakes average people make when enjoying nature.

Failure to Prepare

Whether you forget to bring a map and determine your route beforehand or you make a rookie mistake like not bringing enough water, you could add hours or even days to your trip if you get lost — no to mention lose expensive equipment along the way. That’s why it’s crucial to sit down before hand — even with a hike that you’ve done many times before — and map out your route, procure rations and make sure you have the proper gear.

Mistakes Made in The Great Outdoors

Ignoring Signs

You may think you can handle a bigger workout than you’re actually trained for because at the bottom of a mountain, anything seems possible. Halfway up and you may reconsider. By then it could be too late and you’re already committed to the summit run. Pay attention to marked trails and their ratings. Don’t go for an intense trail with lots of climbing and scaling if you’re just out for a casual scenic hike. Instead, pick a trail for your fitness level and gradually work your way up in ratings over time. Also, don’t go off the marked trail. Doing so could send you on a route that could get you lost in no time.

Failing to Test out New Equipment

One of the biggest mistakes in camping in particular is not testing out equipment such as grills, tents and even sleeping bags beforehand. Before you head out on your trip, make sure the grill works and that you have enough propane to fuel it. Nothing kills a good camping buzz faster than hungry kids huddled around the grill mad at Dad who can’t get the darn thing to work. Set up the tent in the backyard before going, too. Make sure you know exactly how to put it together to save yourself the hassle of wrestling with directions at the camp site. Pack all components of the tent with you, including rain covers and stakes, so you’re well prepared.

Mistakes Made in The Great Outdoors

Leaving out Food and Toiletries

Most people know not to leave out food at a campsite, especially at night when asleep, so that bears and other large animals don’t come a-hunting. But most people don’t realize that many critters, such as raccoons and squirrels, are attracted by the smells of toiletries like toothpaste, soap and bug repellant. Keep these securely packed away as well to avoid unwelcome visitors.

Mistakes Made in The Great Outdoors

Be careful on your next hiking or camping trip by preparing beforehand so you can have the most enjoyable time possible.

Four Tips to Prepare Anyone for Any Hike

Hiking is a fun past time that brings out the most adventurous at heart who wish to experience complete nature submersion, as well as physical challenges that promote a healthy lifestyle. While it may be tempting to just take off into nature, there are some important tips that can help you enjoy your time hiking even more. With some attention to some key details, you can be sure to have a fun and safe hike.

Four Tips to Prepare Anyone for Any Hike

Plan Ahead

Hiking is something that like the boy scouts, you need to be prepared for. Research what each trail consists of before venturing down it, so that you know what you are up against, and are able to bring the proper equipment, according to the Grand Canyon National Park Service. Plenty of water is essential for any hike. It is also important to bring energy boosting snacks. An extra supply is also a good idea, in case of an emergency. One should also be aware of the weather, and make sure to dress appropriately and wear sunscreen. When venturing out on a hike, use the buddy system and to try not to hike alone. Hats, UDAP Bear Spray Backpack, non-cotton clothing, bandanas, ID, healthcare cared, and credit card, and a first aid kit with a fire starting mechanism are useful tools to have when embarking on a long hike.

Four Tips to Prepare Anyone for Any Hike

Leave No Trace

When you are enjoying nature, and the unspoiled natural environment you are in, it is important to leave the environment in the condition in which you found it, according to Alexander Davies of Discovery News. With the exception of picking up human waste and litter left behind by former hikers, it is best to leave the natural habitat as it is. If rock piles are discovered, you should leave them be. You should not carve out new trails, or destroy living matter. You should not do anything that would cause the natural living organisms of the wild to experience any difficulties; causing them to become sick, or even die. This is to ensure that the cherished natural spaces remain in such a state for future generations to come. You must be respectful of nature, and do all that is possible to reduce their impact and footprint upon it. It is as beautiful as it is still because of its lack of human inhabitation.

Have the Proper Gear

In addition to the above-mentioned food, water, and clothing, you should be sure to carry a compass, pocketknife and map. If the hike takes place where the weather gets cold, it is best to bring warm clothing. When camping overnight, it is key to have really great gear such as a UDAP Bear Spray, tent, camping pad, sleeping back, backpack, etc. These can aid in your survival, not matter how rough the conditions.

Be Cognizant of Wild Animals

You may encounter a wild animal, or several during a hike, make sure that you are carrying your UDAP Bear Spray. Be sure to research the wild animals of the area that you are going to be hiking in, as well as studying these animals, and the ways in which you should interact when faced with such a confrontation. Be respectful of the animals and know which plants are edible, as well as which insects, spiders, and snakes are poisonous.

Four Tips to Prepare Anyone for Any Hike

Having the best hiking equipment can aid in preparations for what is ahead. Protection from harmful forces is greater when the equipment used is of the highest quality.

Avoiding Problems While Camping in Grizzly Bear Country

Spring is definitely here and so is the start of camping season. It’s also the time that bears are coming out of hibernation and they are hungry. Avoid problems while camping in grizzly bear country. Not only should you be carrying UDAP Bear Spray, but you should also have a UDAP Bear Shock Electric Fence!

Avoiding Problems While Camping in Grizzly Bear Country

UDAP Bear Shock Electric Fence. In bear country? “Bear” down with some shockingly effective electrical protection! MADE IN THE USA! Lightweight, portable, and adaptable… plenty of wire for up to a 27 x 27′ area! Hey, any bear specialist will tell you that bears who willfully enter a camp are either predatory, or have become used to eating human food. Either way, it’s a dangerous situation. Wouldn’t you rather sleep soundly knowing that you’re protected within the electrically-charged fence of the UDAP Bear Shock Fence? The whole System fits neatly inside a 5 x 20″ bag, and at just over 3 lbs., it’s perfect for backpacking! It easily adapts to any terrain… simply set up your perimeter, fit the poly wire onto the corner posts, and hook up the energizer power source (two D batteries, which can provide up to 5 weeks of power), and you’re good to go. Everything you need is right here, in one bag. So if you want to sleep easy in bear country, hook up this Electric Fence and send bears packin’ with 6,000 volts!

Here’s everything:

(1) Energizer power source;

(4) Durable corner posts;

(3) Electrical poly wires, 100′ long;

(1) Hot wire;

(1) Ground wire;

(1) Ground stake;

(1) Roll of flagging tape;

(1) Water resistant storage bag, 5 x 20″. Fence requires two D batteries (not included). Order yours today! UDAP Bear Shock Electric Fence

Avoiding Problems While Camping in Grizzly Bear Country

Travel Safely in Bear Country

Here is a list for traveling safely in Bear Country!

  1. Where should I keep my food?
  • UDAPmakes bear electric fences for the backcountry including electric fences for food storage and camping. Keep the bears out with BearShock!
  • don’t leave pet food or garbage in areas where bears can get to it.
  • Place garbage in a heavy duty-duty, tied bag. Put the bag inside a garbage can with a bear-proof lid.
  • Beehives attract bears. If you have hives put them up high on hear-proof platforms.

Travel Safely in Bear Country

Keep your food and equipment safe In Bear Country!

  1. How should people visiting bear country behave

Bears are typically afraid and nervous around people. They will avoid humans. Bears may attack people when they feel threatened or surprised or when forced to defend themselves, their cubs, or their food. You should be careful to avoid all bears. Here are some specific tips:

  • Make noise, let bears know you’re there.
  • Travel in groups. Groups are noisier and there is safety in numbers.
  • Keep your dog on a leash at all times.
  • Stick to worn paths and trails and hike during the day, not at night.
  • Watch for bears for signs of them, including bear tracks and droppings.
  • Avoid areas where you spot potential bear food.
  • Don’t forget to carry your UDAP BEAR SPRAY!

Camping in the Back Country of Montana

One of the biggest chores in the backcountry is hanging your food in the trees so bears won’t get to it. It is very time consuming. Not any longer, thanks to the Bear Shock® Food Storage Electric Fence for the backcountry.

Camping in the Back Country of Montana

Nothing says Montana like a backcountry camping experience! But while you are out enjoying the Big Sky Country, please be BEAR AWARE! Being bear-friendly in Montana is something that we pride ourselves on. And it does come with sacrifice—the welfare of the bear always come first even if it means that we won’t be able to see a bear or get that perfect picture. It means taking steps to prevent bears from finding sources of food on your property or when you are out camping like using our Bear Shock® Food Storage Electric Fence.

Did you know that once a bear is food-trained, it is often impossible to un-train them. That is why biologists so often say a fed bear is a dead bear. So let’s don’t feed the bears!

Your attentiveness in keeping your outdoor camp space “Bear Friendly” is doing your part to keep Montana’s grizzly and black bears wild and free.

“Bear Friendly” means allowing every bear to retain its wild and free nature.