Hiking and Backpacking With a Dog Safety Tips

Bear Shock electric phone, Hiking and Backpacking With a Dog Safety Tips

Hiking and backpack camping with dogs is enjoyable. Dogs are excellent companions in the backcountry, although dogs can also pose several problems for backpackers and hikers. One major issue when you are in the backcountry with a dog is that it can create an encounter with a bear.   For instance, If a dog is sleeping in a tent with their human companions, they may be carrying several interesting smells on their coat that bears may find interesting. However it is a very rare occurrence for a bear to invade a tent, and, when they do, it is usually because of left out food scraps or an unkept camp.Be sure to use the UDAP Bear Shock fence at your campground site for protection from bears.

Bear Shock electric phone, Hiking and Backpacking With a Dog Safety Tips

If you do run into a bear out on the trail, a dog may be tempted to run after the bear, barking, and the bear may feel that it has to defend itself. Dog’s can be great instigators of trouble, although when the bear charges the dog, or attacks the dog, the dog is going to run back to you, and he will be bringing the scared, angry bear with him. An encounter like this is completely preventable, by placing a leash on the dog when you are out on the trail.

If you are going to be traveling in bear country with your dogs, leash them, but also give them a job to perform. Dogs can carry their own food and, possibly, other supplies on their backs. Keep the load light, though, dogs should not be required to haul too much weight on the trail. There are even backpacks built exclusively for dogs. If the dog is required to carry important supplies, then they should be leashed. A hot, tired dog isn’t going to consider the load on his back when he sees a wide, muddy puddle or a deep, pristine mountain lake. A dog carrying sleeping bags should be leashed, at least until the backpack is removed.

Dogs do make excellent companions on the trail. Unlike some of your friends at the bottom of your call list, the dog will not complain out on trail. Dogs can also sense possible dangers long before their human counterparts, and dogs may sense that cow moose around the bend, or the rattlesnake coiled at the other side of the log. Although, proper precautions should be taken, when hiking and backpacking with dogs in bear country.

Boots for Hiking and Backpacking

Finding the right hiking boot can be a challenge. The most important aspect to choosing a hiking boots is comfort. Also, the boot should match the hikers ambitions. Day hikers, hiking upon a well-maintained trail, may only need a lightweight trail runner. A backcountry hunter, however, may need a much stiffer boot, designed for steep, rocky terrain.

bear spray

Hiking shoes and trail runners are lightweight options, and many day hikers and backpackers carrying light loads will wear trail runners, because of the lightweight, supple fabric. Shoes are generally more comfortable and forgiving. However, the comfort of wearing shoes does have a tradeoff, because most shoe styles do not offer quality ankle protection. A hiker travelling over steep, rocky terrain, or someone who needs to carry a heavy pack, may need to forgo that comfort for the stiffness of a boot.

Backpacking boots are usually stiff, and the boots are usually cut higher up on the ankle for protection. These boots enable the hiker to carry heavy loads. The stiff boot also helps the hiker on rocky terrain, because the foot doesn’t flex with the edges of rocks, and, when hiking on steep terrain, the stiff boot will help with a hiker’s fatigue. The one thing to remember about stiff boots is that there are break-in requirements. A boot may feel comfortable in the store, but when it is worn for a mile or so, the stiffness of the boot can tire out the foot much more quickly. Also, feet swell after strenuous use, and when feet swell, the boot becomes much more tight while hiking. If the boots fit well, then after the break-in time, they should become more comfortable.

Mountaineering boots are very stiff and offer a great amount of ankle support. Mountaineering boots are usually worn in very steep terrain or on icy, glacial terrain. The boots are also important for ankle protection when carrying very heavy loads.

UDAP Back Attack Pack

When you have determined which boot matches your ambitions as a hiker, there are several things to consider when you choose your own boot. When purchasing a pair of boots, make sure that the boots fit. This sounds like a simple suggestion, and in many ways it is, but boots are worn in demanding locations. A dull pinch on a big toe, or a subtle pressure against the front pad of the foot can translate to an unbearable pain on the trail. Also, when you are trying on hiking boots, make sure to wear the same type of socks that you will use in the boots. If you are hiking in Merino Wool socks, for instance, don’t try on the boots with your sheer black business socks right after work. Also, if you wear orthotics, make sure to take those with you, because the cut on the orthotics, plus the size of your foot, may not match the foot bed of the boot.

Livingston/L.A. stuntman develops backpack bear spray

March 07, 2015 5:00 pm • By Brett French

UDAP Back Attack Pack

The Back Attack Pack is deployed by a ripcord attached to the front of the backpack, somewhat like a parachute ripcord.  It may sound contradictory, but the people taking the biggest risks are usually the most safety conscious.

UDAP Back Attack Pack

Take Billy Lucas, for example. For 30 years the 57-year-old former Marine has been a Hollywood stuntman — part of that acting as Arnold Schwarzenegger’s stunt double in films like “True Lies” and “The Terminator” series of films. So the fact that Lucas brainstormed a design for a new way to deploy bear spray from a backpack actually makes sense. He is very aware of ways to mitigate danger.

“There are no bragging rights in getting hurt,” Lucas said. “Safety is a primary concern, especially in my business.”

And stuntmen who get hurt aren’t going to be available to work, so there’s a monetary incentive for them to be careful.

‘Brainstorm’

Knowing this, it’s a natural progression to the story Lucas tells about one day reading a newspaper story about a man being mauled to death by a bear and wondering if there isn’t a better way to deter attacks. Lucas had recently made the move to Livingston from Los Angeles when the incident occurred. Then he had his own encounter with a bear while fishing with friends and admitted to being spooked.

So Lucas read up on other bear attacks and noticed that when people dropped into defensive positions — lying face-down and covering their necks — they were still very vulnerable.

Lucas said the idea of a reserve parachute gave him the idea of a backpack-based bear spray canister that could be discharged much like pulling the ripcord on a parachute.

“I had a brainstorm and put my money where my mouth was,” he said, paying an engineer to design the first prototype out of aluminum before deciding that was too heavy and going to plastic.

“I like working with my hands and problem solving,” he said. “It’s one of those things that came late in life to me.”

He said he has a couple of other inventions he’s working on as well.

R and D

After three years in research and development, Lucas approached Butte-based bear spray makers UDAP Industries with his invention.

Tim Lynch, general manager for UDAP, said it was a concept other inventors had presented to the company, but UDAP never made the jump to do its own research and development. Lucas was different.

“When he showed up he had a working prototype, which the other inventors didn’t,” Lynch said.

He was so impressed that he shot a video of the backpack to show the bloody face of the bear spray business to the company’s founder, Mark Matheny. After reaching a licensing and distribution deal, last April UDAP unveiled its Back Attack Pack ($149) that can accommodate spray canisters of different sizes and be lashed on to a variety of backpacks.

“It’s exciting to go into a store and see something hanging on the shelf that you’ve built,” Lucas said. “That’s pretty cool.”

Last shot

The backpacks are made to be a secondary or last defense — used in addition to a handheld bear spray.

Lynch said he sees the device as a valuable backup for hunters — who while dressing game can be blindsided from behind by a territorial bear looking to claim a big-game kill. He said an Alaskan study showed that in the majority of bear-human encounters, the person had only 1.8 seconds to react. That’s barely enough time to pull the trigger on a bear spray canister in your hand, so a backup seems like a good idea.

“This is designed to get that bear off your back,” Lynch said. “It’s not to replace spray, but in addition to it. This is sort of a backup, like a reserve parachute.”

To view the original story in the Billings Gazette… Click here.

To order the Back Attack Pack or learn more visit:

www.BearSpray.com

The Bears Are Coming Out, Be Prepared

By Nina Sveinson

With the mild winter, Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks reports that some bears are starting to come out of hibernation early. Click here to watch Wake Up Montana featuring UDAP’s Back Attack Pack

The Bears Are Coming Out, Be Prepared

Hunting in Bear Country

Are you planning to go on a hunting trip in bear country? Obtaining the proper hunting equipment and understanding how to effectively use it can prevent a major threat to your life. Bears are a valuable species, but a number of people are afraid of them due to their nature. Understanding how a bear behaves will help hunters understand bears better, making it easier to protect yourself while hunting in bear country.

Hunt in the Right Season

Hunting season is upon us. Bears are extremely active in the fall as they are packing on as much food as possible for hibernation. It is easier to spot the bears in the fall since they are extremely active.

Hunting in Bear Country

Don’t Surprise a Bear

One of the reasons why bears often attack is because they are startled. Hunters are focused on being quiet, and they often forget about their own safety. A bear is a solitary animal who avoids people. Normally the bear will retreat if they see or hear a human. They normally strike when they are protecting their young or their territory. Bears are surprised easily, and they can strike when they are startled.

Recognize Bear Signs

It is important to learn how to recognize bear signs. While most hunters know how to track a bear, some people are unaware of basic signs including the following:

•    Identify bear claws on the trees

•    Search for fresh tracks

•    Avoid hunting on a windy day as your scent can carry several miles away, altering a bear you are in their area

•    Hunt in a group

Invest in Gear

One of the most important things you can do is invest in the right clothing and gear for hunting. Clothing you hunt in needs to help you blend in with the scents of the area. Cover your hands and wear clothing to reduce any personal odors. Hunting with others is beneficial as it too will help you to stay safe and obtain medical attention if you are injured.

After the Kill

Hunting and cleaning a carcass is a challenge that you need to carefully follow to prevent bears from attacking. A carcass should be stored about 15 feet above the ground so you do not hang it close to where bears can reach it. Never keep food around camp as it can attract bears.

Hunting in Bear Country

Take Precautions

It is important to focus on taking precautions before you go hunting. Learn the proper procedures to follow if you encounter a bear. The most important thing you need to remember is to stay calm. Slowly move away from the bear and give them a chance to identify you as a person that is not a threat. If the bear charges you, do not shoot. Most hunters panic when the bear is charging and they start shooting, simply wounding a bear and provoking them. The best option to use is to arm yourself with UDAP Bear Spray. Keep UDAP Bear Spray with you at all times, you never know when a bear might surprise you while you are hunting. With the right preparation and precautions, you can stay safe when you are hunting in bear country.

Mistakes Made in The Great Outdoors

Hiking, camping and backpacking are all excellent ways to experience the wonder of the Great Outdoors. However, it can also be a dangerous way to witness Mother Nature in all her fury. Simple common mistakes made hastily can have inconvenient and even disastrous consequences. Here we explore some common mistakes average people make when enjoying nature.

Failure to Prepare

Whether you forget to bring a map and determine your route beforehand or you make a rookie mistake like not bringing enough water, you could add hours or even days to your trip if you get lost — no to mention lose expensive equipment along the way. That’s why it’s crucial to sit down before hand — even with a hike that you’ve done many times before — and map out your route, procure rations and make sure you have the proper gear.

Mistakes Made in The Great Outdoors

Ignoring Signs

You may think you can handle a bigger workout than you’re actually trained for because at the bottom of a mountain, anything seems possible. Halfway up and you may reconsider. By then it could be too late and you’re already committed to the summit run. Pay attention to marked trails and their ratings. Don’t go for an intense trail with lots of climbing and scaling if you’re just out for a casual scenic hike. Instead, pick a trail for your fitness level and gradually work your way up in ratings over time. Also, don’t go off the marked trail. Doing so could send you on a route that could get you lost in no time.

Failing to Test out New Equipment

One of the biggest mistakes in camping in particular is not testing out equipment such as grills, tents and even sleeping bags beforehand. Before you head out on your trip, make sure the grill works and that you have enough propane to fuel it. Nothing kills a good camping buzz faster than hungry kids huddled around the grill mad at Dad who can’t get the darn thing to work. Set up the tent in the backyard before going, too. Make sure you know exactly how to put it together to save yourself the hassle of wrestling with directions at the camp site. Pack all components of the tent with you, including rain covers and stakes, so you’re well prepared.

Mistakes Made in The Great Outdoors

Leaving out Food and Toiletries

Most people know not to leave out food at a campsite, especially at night when asleep, so that bears and other large animals don’t come a-hunting. But most people don’t realize that many critters, such as raccoons and squirrels, are attracted by the smells of toiletries like toothpaste, soap and bug repellant. Keep these securely packed away as well to avoid unwelcome visitors.

Mistakes Made in The Great Outdoors

Be careful on your next hiking or camping trip by preparing beforehand so you can have the most enjoyable time possible.

Benefits of Fly Fishing in Alaska

Fly fishing in Alaska is plenty of fun for the avid outdoorsman. If you like to fish, there is a huge opportunity to catch many types of fish in Alaska. Fly fishing can be enjoyed in various regions of Alaska and the choices seem to be limitless. There are oceans, lakes, streams, and rivers in most parts of Alaska. The fact that there is salt water and fresh water fishing areas available all over the state makes it possible to catch a wide variety of fish in different environments.

Tips for Alaskan Flyfishing

Flyfishing in Alaska can be done successfully with some tips and tricks. It doesn’t have to be frustrating for the first-time flyfisherman in Alaska. Depending on the type of water that you want to fish in, there are ways to make it easier and ensure that fishing will be bountiful. It simply requires some useful tips and knowledge to be successful at flyfishing in Alaska.

For those that like to fish in streams and rivers, there can seem to be an overabundance of other fishermen. Some of the more popular streams and rivers have this issue. It can make it seem as though the fish are scared to bite. However, there are a couple of tips to help you. Using patterns that are subdued and minimized can be helpful in these busy areas. Make sure to have smaller sizes in your flyfishing gear in case this strategy is needed.

Although flyfishing in the ocean is less popular, there are those that enjoy it immensely and are quite successful at catching the many different species in the ocean’s saltwater. Some of the best places to catch saltwater fish species is in the-inter tidal areas around mouths of rivers and streams. Many fishermen report catching plenty of Pacific salmon in those spots along the river mouths and streams that are filled with waters and fish from the ocean.

There are still bodies of water in Alaska. The still bodies of water are typically ponds and lakes. Having the right equipment can help access these waters and fish. The use of a canoe or a kick boats is common. Sometimes access to still waters is difficult, often requiring navigation through forests that requires creative traveling. Bears can be a concern in the forest area and having bear spray is recommended at all times, no matter where in Alaska one is fishing. You may also want to try the UDAP Bear Spray Backpack!

Benefits of Fly Fishing in Alaska

Once you have found some great fishing spots to enjoy the sport, there are some tips that can make it easier. Knowing some methods that will make fly fishing more fruitful can help. Removing the hook on a fish that is large can be a challenge but it can be done easier. One tip is to turn the fish upside down and this results in the fish not struggling because it becomes disoriented. This makes it much easier to remove the hook and results in less injury to a catch. Having good knot methods for fly fishing in Alaska is helpful as well. A useful tip is to use an open clinch knot as it is one of the most effective knots for anglers. Also, don’t forget to carry UDAP bear spray because Alaska is known for having a large bear population in and around its lakes, forests, and streams.

Benefits of Fly Fishing in Alaska

Four Tips to Prepare Anyone for Any Hike

Hiking is a fun past time that brings out the most adventurous at heart who wish to experience complete nature submersion, as well as physical challenges that promote a healthy lifestyle. While it may be tempting to just take off into nature, there are some important tips that can help you enjoy your time hiking even more. With some attention to some key details, you can be sure to have a fun and safe hike.

Four Tips to Prepare Anyone for Any Hike

Plan Ahead

Hiking is something that like the boy scouts, you need to be prepared for. Research what each trail consists of before venturing down it, so that you know what you are up against, and are able to bring the proper equipment, according to the Grand Canyon National Park Service. Plenty of water is essential for any hike. It is also important to bring energy boosting snacks. An extra supply is also a good idea, in case of an emergency. One should also be aware of the weather, and make sure to dress appropriately and wear sunscreen. When venturing out on a hike, use the buddy system and to try not to hike alone. Hats, UDAP Bear Spray Backpack, non-cotton clothing, bandanas, ID, healthcare cared, and credit card, and a first aid kit with a fire starting mechanism are useful tools to have when embarking on a long hike.

Four Tips to Prepare Anyone for Any Hike

Leave No Trace

When you are enjoying nature, and the unspoiled natural environment you are in, it is important to leave the environment in the condition in which you found it, according to Alexander Davies of Discovery News. With the exception of picking up human waste and litter left behind by former hikers, it is best to leave the natural habitat as it is. If rock piles are discovered, you should leave them be. You should not carve out new trails, or destroy living matter. You should not do anything that would cause the natural living organisms of the wild to experience any difficulties; causing them to become sick, or even die. This is to ensure that the cherished natural spaces remain in such a state for future generations to come. You must be respectful of nature, and do all that is possible to reduce their impact and footprint upon it. It is as beautiful as it is still because of its lack of human inhabitation.

Have the Proper Gear

In addition to the above-mentioned food, water, and clothing, you should be sure to carry a compass, pocketknife and map. If the hike takes place where the weather gets cold, it is best to bring warm clothing. When camping overnight, it is key to have really great gear such as a UDAP Bear Spray, tent, camping pad, sleeping back, backpack, etc. These can aid in your survival, not matter how rough the conditions.

Be Cognizant of Wild Animals

You may encounter a wild animal, or several during a hike, make sure that you are carrying your UDAP Bear Spray. Be sure to research the wild animals of the area that you are going to be hiking in, as well as studying these animals, and the ways in which you should interact when faced with such a confrontation. Be respectful of the animals and know which plants are edible, as well as which insects, spiders, and snakes are poisonous.

Four Tips to Prepare Anyone for Any Hike

Having the best hiking equipment can aid in preparations for what is ahead. Protection from harmful forces is greater when the equipment used is of the highest quality.

Summer Has Finally Arrived

Summer has finally arrived! Woohoo! Let the camping and hiking begin. If you are heading to bear country, don’t forget to bring along your UDAP Bear Spray!  Being prepared in bear country can be the difference between life and death. And now, you can stay safer than ever before!

UDAP now carries the Back Attack Pack™, which allows you to protect yourself from unexpected charges from behind, AND even when you’re pinned on the ground. Yes, you still have a line of defense!

Produced by a grizzly bear attack survivor, this product is a must-have. To be used in addition with UDAP bear sprays as a backup only.

Summer Has Finally Arrived

So go out and enjoy the summer, enjoy bear country, and be SAFE!

Bears Coming Out of Hibernation Early

Bears came out of hibernation early this winter on the west coast due to abnormal dry winter and drought. Because of these same weather conditions, black bears may come down closer and closer to where people are looking for food. Do you have your bear spray handy and/or a plan ready for a black bear encounter? To learn more about the black bears coming out of hibernation early, you can read this article published by CBS news!
Read more here…

Bears Coming Out of Hibernation Early