Hiking and Backpacking With a Dog Safety Tips

Bear Shock electric phone, Hiking and Backpacking With a Dog Safety Tips

Hiking and backpack camping with dogs is enjoyable. Dogs are excellent companions in the backcountry, although dogs can also pose several problems for backpackers and hikers. One major issue when you are in the backcountry with a dog is that it can create an encounter with a bear.   For instance, If a dog is sleeping in a tent with their human companions, they may be carrying several interesting smells on their coat that bears may find interesting. However it is a very rare occurrence for a bear to invade a tent, and, when they do, it is usually because of left out food scraps or an unkept camp.Be sure to use the UDAP Bear Shock fence at your campground site for protection from bears.

Bear Shock electric phone, Hiking and Backpacking With a Dog Safety Tips

If you do run into a bear out on the trail, a dog may be tempted to run after the bear, barking, and the bear may feel that it has to defend itself. Dog’s can be great instigators of trouble, although when the bear charges the dog, or attacks the dog, the dog is going to run back to you, and he will be bringing the scared, angry bear with him. An encounter like this is completely preventable, by placing a leash on the dog when you are out on the trail.

If you are going to be traveling in bear country with your dogs, leash them, but also give them a job to perform. Dogs can carry their own food and, possibly, other supplies on their backs. Keep the load light, though, dogs should not be required to haul too much weight on the trail. There are even backpacks built exclusively for dogs. If the dog is required to carry important supplies, then they should be leashed. A hot, tired dog isn’t going to consider the load on his back when he sees a wide, muddy puddle or a deep, pristine mountain lake. A dog carrying sleeping bags should be leashed, at least until the backpack is removed.

Dogs do make excellent companions on the trail. Unlike some of your friends at the bottom of your call list, the dog will not complain out on trail. Dogs can also sense possible dangers long before their human counterparts, and dogs may sense that cow moose around the bend, or the rattlesnake coiled at the other side of the log. Although, proper precautions should be taken, when hiking and backpacking with dogs in bear country.

Archery Elk Season

The archery elk season in Montana is underway. And, for the archery elk hunter who has spent his summer exploring remote stands of timber most hunters only glance at on Google Earth, while hiking countless backcountry miles and prematurely wearing the sole from a pair of hunting boots, congratulations on your effort and good luck on this seasons hunt. For those hunters, however, that haven’t spent as much time in the backcountry this season, or for those hunters that aren’t sure how to effectively scout for the season, here are a few tips to help.

Archery Elk Season, bow hunting season montana

When you are out scouting, the most obvious signs of elk activity are droppings, tracks, and rubs. Elk are transient by nature, so being really excited about evidence of elk may be jumping the gun, so to speak. Pay attention to the freshness of the rubs on the trees, or the prevalence of the tracks, and know that it only means that elk may frequent that area, and there are a few other ways of figuring out more precise locations and patterns for the elk when the rut begins.

If you are scouting and you find a bull before the rut has begun, don’t be too excited. That bull most likely will be somewhere else when the rut actually begins. So, when you are doing your preseason scouting, make sure to pay attention to the cow elk. When those cows go into heat, those bulls wont let them out of sight.

Also, while scouting, look for elk wallows (areas where bull elk may tear up the ground to reach the mud and moisture). When the rut is on, elk will use a wallow every day, most likely in the heat of the afternoon, so knowing where fresh or old wallows are is a big advantage. Those bulls run really hot during the rut, and rely on the mud and moisture from those wallows to cool down. Areas to look for that could be potential wallows are in meadows – pay close attention to the edges of the meadows where moisture may run off and collect. Also, look for bright green patches of grasses on densely timbered slopes. Near creeks and lake are obvious choices, and also near beaver dams.

And don’t forget your UDAP Bear Spray and have it accessible in a UDAP holster while you are bow hunting this season! Archery Elk Season, UDAP hip holster for bear spray

Bear Spray Recycling Information

We’d like to encourage everyone to RECYCLE their bear spray canisters! There is a bear spray recycling machine located in the greater Yellowstone area. Bear Spray recycling is a fantastic concept and in May of 2011 the first ever fully functioning machine was built. If you recreate in and around Yellowstone, you can drop off your bear spray at many Forest Service and Fish and Wildlife Parks locations. If you are traveling, you may drop off your bear spray to be recycled at any of the park entrances, many hotels, and some airports prior to leaving. Also, if you wish to send us your canister directly we will recycle it for you.

Bear Spray Recycling

To send a canister to UDAP, please use this address.

UDAP Industries, Inc.

Recycling Dept.

1703 Waterline Road

Butte , MT 59701

Expired cans can also be used for training you and your family. Be sure to practice with it away from people, buildings and pets. Make sure it is in an area where the spray will not return to you and your family causing the uncomfortable effects of the product.

You can also give your spray to a friend or relative if it has not been used. We would never recommend using a canister from someone that has sprayed it before. You can even give it to a ranger in the park. Many rangers will take the product as they or their coworkers use it frequently for practice.

The recycling process is significantly efficient. It has the capability to actually separate the active ingredient from the inert contents through a coalescing filter process. Then the separated ingredients can be reused. Early on in development UDAP mentioned that the propellant could possibly be used to recharge air conditioners in vehicles. It is our understanding that this is what’s being done. Also we introduced the idea of the pepper being used in paints for the bottom of boats. Pepper deters barnacles from attaching to surfaces that have been pepper treated. Also pepper is used in creams in pharmaceuticals for arthritis pain relief.  The aluminum canister is sold to a recycling business.

Hiking in The Great Outdoors

Are you a hiker or do you just like to take long strolls in God’s Country? Well if you answered yes to that question, please don’t forget your bear spray. Hottest Bear spray works on more than just bear! Read below to her what one of our customers had to say about her encounter with a moose!

“UDAP works on moose! 
On a trail run with our dogs in Red Lodge, MT this morning we came across a moose and new calf. Our dogs are trained to not bark at or harass wildlife- and we even went off trail to give her a wide berth, but even that wasn’t enough to keep her from charging. She took 2 blasts from our canisters- and it was like she hit a glass wall. She charged 3 more times from different angles and each time took spray to the face. She moved on, and so did we.”

Thank you for such a great product! We don’t go into the backcountry without it. – Charlene Giffin- Roberts, MT

Hiking in the Great Outdoors

We encourage you to get outdoors and enjoy nature the way it was intended to be appreciated! Bring your camera, take lots of pictures and don’t forget your bear spray for all of those wild animals that you may encounter along the way!

Camping in Yellowstone Park

Are you an avid camper? Or want something fun and different to do with your family this summer? Camping in Yellowstone Park is an awesome way to enjoy the park with your family. Some of the highlights and attractions include amazing backcountry, bicycle-friendly campsite, RV parks and hiking to name a few. There are numerous camping options in Yellowstone Park. For a complete list of campsites please click here for more information.

 

Camping in Yellowstone Park

And as always, remember when you’re outdoors in bear country this summer to carry your Bear spray with you at all times!

Article in the Montana Standard

January 23, 2011 12:00 am  • 
Montana

Shortly after Tim Lynch told his Bozeman boss about his interest in moving home to Butte, the company and Lynch’s family soon had a new mailing address.

Since late in 2008, Universal Defense Alternative Products Inc. has operated from a new facility just off Harrison Avenue.

Lynch, a Butte native, serves as general manager of the bear spray company’s 4,000-square-foot Butte operation.

“We are doing very well and we are growing at a very fast pace,” Lynch said. “We had a great year.”

The company formed in 1994, two years after a grizzly bear attacked owner Mark Matheny while bow hunting in Gallatin County.

To read the full article click here.

 

About Mark Matheny

Mark MathenyMr. Matheny, an outdoorsman and resident of Bozeman , Montana , has become something of a Western legend as a result of a near-fatal 1992 attack he suffered while hunting and inadvertently encountering a female grizzly protecting her cubs. His survival is attributed to the fact that his friend was carrying pepper spray.

In the years following the attack, Mr. Matheny became a tireless advocate of safety in the wild, lecturing, presenting seminars and distributing literature about the realities, causes, and prevention of bear attacks. He was a sponsor and presenter of Wyoming Game and Fish Department’s “Living in Bear/Lion Country” workshop and he regularly speaks to children in schools around Southwest Montana on preventing animal attacks.

Mr. Matheny also has made safety in bear country a vocation as well as his avocation. The company he founded in 1994, UDAP Industries, manufactures a variety of safety products that include pepper spray for bear deterrent and personal defense under the trademarked name PepperPower®, bear resistant canisters, and bear electric fences , all of which are widely used by state and federal wildlife agencies and avid outdoorsmen.

For Mark’s full story visit: http://www.bearspray.com/story-of-mark-matheny/